Bendy Batteries Coming Soon from Samsung?
Samsung may just have unveiled a critical piece to the wearable tech puzzle. The Korean company showed off a bendable battery today at the InterBattery 2014 Convention in South Korea. The power source is said to be the “world’s first truly flexible battery” and it could be used in devices that need to be wrapped around a person’s wrist.
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Earlier this year, Samsung launched the first wearable with a curved screen, the Gear Fit, which also featured a curved power cell. This new battery, which according to Digital Trends has competed its development stage, would make future wearables from Samsung even more contoured and comfortable.

Bendy Batteries Coming Soon from Samsung?

Samsung may just have unveiled a critical piece to the wearable tech puzzle. The Korean company showed off a bendable battery today at the InterBattery 2014 Convention in South Korea. The power source is said to be the “world’s first truly flexible battery” and it could be used in devices that need to be wrapped around a person’s wrist.

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Will.i.am Launches PULS Standalone Smartwatch
Black Eyed Peas Musician now tech entrepreneur, will.i.am, officially launched his smartwatch today at the Salesforce Dreamforce event. The cuff-like device, called PULS, is a standalone smartwatch meaning it can work untethered from your smartphone to perform operations like texting, calling, checking your mail and your calendar.
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PULS was unveiled in true will.i.am style in a showcase which featured music, imagery, poetry and a fashion show. will.i.am highlighted PULS as being much as a fashion accessory as it is a wearable device. "i.amPULS represents digital freedom, individuality, intelligence and the intersection where fashion and technical innovation meet," said will.i.am.  "I’m honored to share my vision for the PULS with this global audience."
Like other smartwatches, PULS uses a voice assistant to perform many of its functions. Aneeda, powered by Nuance Communications, powers the voice for PULS which acts as a personal assistant that can take dictation for texts and emails, play music, post to social media, queue maps and a fitness app, schedule appointments, make calls, and more
To view a replay of will.i.am’s Keynote speech at Dreamforce 2014, go to http://www.salesforce.com/dreamforce/DF14/videos.jsp

Will.i.am Launches PULS Standalone Smartwatch

Black Eyed Peas Musician now tech entrepreneur, will.i.am, officially launched his smartwatch today at the Salesforce Dreamforce event. The cuff-like device, called PULS, is a standalone smartwatch meaning it can work untethered from your smartphone to perform operations like texting, calling, checking your mail and your calendar.

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Bionym Now Shipping Limited Edition Nymi Bands to Developers
Bionym, the company behind the heartbeat authentication, announced today that they are starting to ship limited edition Nymi bands. The persistent identity wristband aims to disrupt the authentication space allowing users to do away with passwords, pins and passcodes.  
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Back in August, Bionym released its Beta SDK and an emulator, aka the “Nymulator”, to encourage developers to create apps for the wearable device. To be eligible for one of the limited edition bracelets, Bionym is asking developers to record a video of the application they have built using the emulator and submit it to be put in the queue.
The company stated in its blog today that they have begun testing and manufacturing of production units and have already shipped some limited edition bands to key partners and developers who have already built applications using the emulator.
One of these partners is Brivo Labs who have created an app that unlocks doors when a user is authenticated using the Nymi. You can check the integration of the Nymi with this app below.

For those that have pre-ordered the Nymi and aren’t a developer, Bionym has indicated that they will be in touch soon!
Photo credit: Bionym

Bionym Now Shipping Limited Edition Nymi Bands to Developers

Bionym, the company behind the heartbeat authentication, announced today that they are starting to ship limited edition Nymi bands. The persistent identity wristband aims to disrupt the authentication space allowing users to do away with passwords, pins and passcodes.  

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Britain Loves Wearable Tech
A recent report from YouGov finds that currently 2.8 million people in the UK currently own wearable technology and that this number is expected to grow by nearly 2 million to 4.7 million by the end of the holiday season. And this is just the start. The report suggests that wearable tech penetration in the UK will more than double by next year from 6% to 13% of the population. 
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YouGov’s report presented that the largest category of wearables for those in the UK are fitness devices with 3% of the population. While smartwatches sit at a mere 1% at this time.
In looking more closely at the demographic for these devices, smartwatches skewed more male with 75% of those owning a smartwatch while fitness devices were nearly a 50/50 split between gender.
YouGov’s complete findings and its technology section report can be found here.

Britain Loves Wearable Tech

A recent report from YouGov finds that currently 2.8 million people in the UK currently own wearable technology and that this number is expected to grow by nearly 2 million to 4.7 million by the end of the holiday season. And this is just the start. The report suggests that wearable tech penetration in the UK will more than double by next year from 6% to 13% of the population. 

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Live Stream Your Life from Weloop Smart Glasses
We love to capture our lives but often miss the moment in doing so. How many times have you gone to a concert or music festival to watch the band through the screen of your smartphone, or someone else’s for that matter. Smart glasses equipped with embedded cameras are here to change all that. And the latest to join this category is a new Kickstarter project called Weloop.
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Weloop smart glasses feature a 480p image-stablized camera on the frame of the glasses. The body of the glasses is where you will also find the battery, microphone, WiFi chip and haptic feedback. The WiFi connectivity allows you to stream your video to a paired iPhone or Android app where you can either record, share privately or share to the Weloop community via the Weloop app. You only need to have internet access for live streaming. You can still stream directly to your device (and record) without internet connectivity which is a great feature considering that the device itself doesn’t have any onboard memory. 

To make the streaming device more stylish, Weloop is offering black frames with dark lenses and tortoise shell with clear frames. Both frames can be taken to your optometrist to have your prescription lenses fitted. 
Weloop is offering its pair of glasses for as low as $99 to it first round of backers on Kickstarter with an expected shipping date of February 2015. 

Live Stream Your Life from Weloop Smart Glasses

We love to capture our lives but often miss the moment in doing so. How many times have you gone to a concert or music festival to watch the band through the screen of your smartphone, or someone else’s for that matter. Smart glasses equipped with embedded cameras are here to change all that. And the latest to join this category is a new Kickstarter project called Weloop.

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Samsung Gear S Gets Its First Browser, Opera Mini
Samsung’s first standalone smartwatch, the Gear S, is getting even more independent from the smartphone with a full internet browser. Opera announced today that its Opera Mini app will be made available to Gear S users for download.
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Opera Mini for Gear S will bring the full internet experience to users on the smartwatch. The popular browser, known for its compression technology that shrinks the size of webpages to as little as 10%, has been modified slightly for the Gear S to include “finger-friendly features”. The Speed Dial function shows favorite web shortcuts as large buttons to help users get to a web page in one tap. 
"As a lightweight but powerful browser maker, Opera has been a pioneer of making the web accessible across a huge variety of connected devices, such as the internet keyboard, the dual-screen handheld game console, VOIP phones and, now, wearable device,” says Lars Boilesen, CEO of Opera Software. “We are thrilled that Opera Mini will be the first browser for  Samsung Gear S users to download. This is an exciting, new experience for smart-gear users.”
This isn’t the first browser we have seen on a smartwatch. Android Wear watches have had access to WIB: Wear Internet Browser for a while now. WIB has been downloaded over 10,000 times by users according to stats available in Google Play. But Opera Mini is the first of the major browser options to make its way to the wrist. 
As the smartwatch screen is extremely small compared to even the smallest of smartphones, its still unclear if a web browser is a necessary app for smarwatch users especially as web pages are not optimized for this type of experience. 

Samsung Gear S Gets Its First Browser, Opera Mini

Samsung’s first standalone smartwatch, the Gear S, is getting even more independent from the smartphone with a full internet browser. Opera announced today that its Opera Mini app will be made available to Gear S users for download.

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Dubai Police Fighting Crime with Google Glass
Dubai is about to go full out Robocop with the use of Google Glass for fighting crime. The city has already outfitted its police with Glass to report minor traffic violations. Now, according to a report from Reuteurs, they intend to issue its detectives with Glass to find criminals using facial recognition.
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Detectives wearing Glass will use a custom built app that scans the faces of people and then attempt to find a match of the “face print” in the police database to alert them of any suspects.
The Dubai Police already have its own Glassware for traffic violations. It allows them to document a scene by taking pictures of the accident or violation. And it also uses the camera to scan vehicle plates to check on any infractions.
This isn’t the first cool “toy” Dubai police have been equipped with. Last year, the Dubai police force issued the use of $400,000 Lamborghini Sports Cars in major tourist destinations. 

Dubai Police Fighting Crime with Google Glass

Dubai is about to go full out Robocop with the use of Google Glass for fighting crime. The city has already outfitted its police with Glass to report minor traffic violations. Now, according to a report from Reuteurs, they intend to issue its detectives with Glass to find criminals using facial recognition.

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Intel’s Basis Announces New Smartwatch, Peak
Basis has long been a leader in running watches even before the term “wearable technology” was coined. Founded in 2010, Basis Science was acquired by Intel in March of this year. Now under Intel’s wing, Basis has revealed its first new wearable yesterday called Peak
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Peak is aimed at those that want a device to monitor their health and fitness, something Basis knows quite well. The smartwatch doesn’t yet have the typical communication features others on the market currently include, like getting text messages or checking email, but the website indicates that these will be added in a free future release.
Peak does come equipped with sensors that allow for advanced fitness and sleep tracking. The watch has four sensors including an optical light sensor, 3-axis accelerometer and sensors that monitor skin temperature and gavlanic skin response.
These sensors let Peak continuously monitor your heart rate, track steps, and see how your body is reacting to changing climates and activity. For sleep trackers, Peak features automatic sleep detection, and monitors your sleep cycles using its sensors including deep sleep and REM. 
Peak pairs with an app (iOS and Android) to let you see your data, trends and goes a step further by providing insights and suggestions based on your data to help you lead a healthier life. The device is waterproof up to 5 ATM which means you can swim with it and has a battery life of up to 4 days. 
“Since our first product, Basis has continued to set a high standard of rich data and insights for both fitness and sleep,” said Jef Holove, general manager of Basis. “Now with Peak, we’ve achieved an even higher level of performance and extended functionality, delivering an all-in-one device to help people live healthier day and night, at work or working out.”
Basis expects to retail the watch for $199.99 and its expected to be available before the holiday season in November.

Intel’s Basis Announces New Smartwatch, Peak

Basis has long been a leader in running watches even before the term “wearable technology” was coined. Founded in 2010, Basis Science was acquired by Intel in March of this year. Now under Intel’s wing, Basis has revealed its first new wearable yesterday called Peak

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Creating Successful Voice Interactions With Connected Products
Voice is increasingly becoming a necessary and very powerful input especially for the wearable and IoT categories which often have devices with small screens or no screens at all. When building a product that uses voice, it’s essential that the first interactions with a user are positive and successful, or you risk losing them completely. To help guide designers and developers in creating this first great experience, Tanya Kraljic, a principal interaction and dialog designer at Nuance Communications, imparted some tips at this week’s Designers of Things conference.
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Before you add voice to your product, its important to answer a couple of essential questions about what you are creating. These questions are the same whether you are building a talking toaster, a smart thermostat or interactions within a connected car: what will it do, what will it understand, what will it know about and how will it sound. 
With this in mind, Kraljic recommends starting off any voice interacxtion with an introduction. This doesn’t have to be a long, drawn out tutorial but it does need to be effective and simple enough so that it establishes a successful interaction. To continue this positive experience, Kraljic suggests that voice systems use language that comes naturally to the user by anticipating basic commands that mimic natural behaviors. Most users will often start with simple phrases, so figuring out what these phrases are in context to overall user experience will go a long way in creating successful voice interactions.
But just as important as recognizing, interpreting and responding to what the user is saying is assuring the user that the system is listening and is still there. Kraljic stressed the importance of conversational feedback in a voice system which can be achieved by using visual or audible cues. Pulsing circles, waving lines or even just the use of the word “Listening” are all great ways to incorporate cues into the experience that reassures them that the system is still there when they are talking.
Using on-screen visuals to encourage users to speak about a specific topic is another way to create a successful voice experience. Kraljic pointed out that users will often speak about what they see on screen and suggested that displaying relevant and/or coaching information on the screen during the voice interaction is a proactive way to provide guidance for the user. 
This interplay between voice and other forms of input and feedback such as touch and haptics is also an important one. “Users expect modalities to work together,” she said. She gave the example of a smartwatch which uses voice to initiate a call and then allow the user to select the correct caller from a list on the screen in which they would tap from. 
Despite doing your best to set up a successful voice experience for users, there will be times when things don’t work as planned. But that’s to be expected says Kraljic. “Human communication doesn’t always succeed either,” she said. “It’s ok to have an error in a voice system as long as users know how to fix it”. Letting users know that the command they gave was incorrect and guiding them to use the right one is an opportunity to turn it all around.  

Creating Successful Voice Interactions With Connected Products

Voice is increasingly becoming a necessary and very powerful input especially for the wearable and IoT categories which often have devices with small screens or no screens at all. When building a product that uses voice, it’s essential that the first interactions with a user are positive and successful, or you risk losing them completely. To help guide designers and developers in creating this first great experience, Tanya Kraljic, a principal interaction and dialog designer at Nuance Communications, imparted some tips at this week’s Designers of Things conference.

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Wearables As An Extension Of Your Body, Developing with Myo
Controlling the digital environment with the wave of a hand has long been a dream of many who have grown up watching Sci-Fi and Action flicks like “Minority Report” and “Iron Man”. Earlier this week at the Designers of Things conference, sixty people got the chance to make this dream come true. Thalmic Labs’ led a hands-on intensive session of its gesture-control armband, Myo, which gave the audience a chance to use the device and develop their first app which would use their hand gestures as inputs.
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Thalmic Labs’ Developer Evangelist, Chris Goodine, started off the session by breaking down the wearable landscape in a presentation he controlled with the flick of his wrist. Goodine divided the growing wearable space into two categories: input and output devices. Output devices were defined as devices that send data to users usually showing it to users on screens. Some great examples include smartwatches like the Moto 360 or Samsung Gear and heads-up displays like Google Glass. In contrast, input devices are those that collect data from the user and use it in some meaningful manner. In this category we have activity trackers like Fitbit or Jawbone’s UP, brain-sensing devices like Muse and of course the Myo.
The Myo is an armband that uses the kinetic energy and movement of your hand to control any connected thing. The device understands a variety of hand gestures including swiping left and right, making a fist and spreading your fingers wide. Each gesture correlates to an action in an application which would be set by the developer of the software. With the Myo you are able to move through slides in a PowerPoint presentation, change channels on your Smart TV and even turn on your Phillips Hue lights all with a single gesture with your hand. Goodine also walked through some examples of how Myo could be paired with other wearables such as virtual reality headsets and smartglasses to enhance the experience. 
Thalmic provided one Myo for each team of two at the event and we watched as, one-by-one, team members put the Myo on their arm and started to wave their hands through the guided set-up sequence. The Myo currently has a set of six gestures which you need to get familiar with to use the device. The set-up sequence teaches you these gestures by requiring you to use them to both move through the instructional and in exercises Thalmic Labs has included to make sure your first experiences with the device are a positive one.   
Once the teams had a chance to get familiar with the Myo, Goodine walked them through an exercise to build their first app for the device. Using the Myo SDK, teams were tasked with updating the classic arcade game, Tetris, so that it could interpret gestures for gameplay. Teams were asked to code the app so that moving your hand to the right or left would move your Tetris block back and forth and a spread of your fingers would turn the block around so that you can fit it into place.  
The developer community for Thalmic is extremely critical as they will be responsible for creating applications for the device. We have already seen how developers are using the Myo to drive unmanned vehicles, control x-wings in games, and exploring how to use the device to interpret sign language.

Wearables As An Extension Of Your Body, Developing with Myo

Controlling the digital environment with the wave of a hand has long been a dream of many who have grown up watching Sci-Fi and Action flicks like “Minority Report” and “Iron Man”. Earlier this week at the Designers of Things conference, sixty people got the chance to make this dream come true. Thalmic Labs’ led a hands-on intensive session of its gesture-control armband, Myo, which gave the audience a chance to use the device and develop their first app which would use their hand gestures as inputs.

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The Challenge of Designing A Biometric Wearable for the Body
The Nymi is a connected wristband that uses your heart beat to prove who you are to other connected things. The wristband offers persistent identity at a time when we are constantly having to provide proof of who we are online and off using cards from our wallet, pins and passwords. CEO and Co-founder Karl Martin took to the stage yesterday at the end of Day 1 at the Designers of Things conference to talk to the crowd about the design journey for the Nymi and the challenges they worked through in designing for the human body.
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Martin candidly pulled back the curtain on the making of the Nymi yesterday at the conference in an effort to help those that are thinking about making a body-worn biometric wearable. His presentation was filled with images showing the progression of the Nymi design from its shape, to its components and overall aesthetic. It was clear from the presentation that a lot of thinking went into ensuring that the Nymi was something people would want to wear as well as something the company could execute on.  

One of the biggest design challenges was the issue of size and fit. With human wrist sizes differing between and even within genders,  it was critical to come up with a design that would ensure that the wristband sat comfortably on a wide variety of wrists. Martin showed some of the early design concepts they were considering to tackle this challenge including using an “overlap” model which is similar to what Jawbone UP uses. The team settled on a design that was simple and would only need to be adjusted once out of the box.
Martin made it clear that Bionym was careful not to make the Nymi watch-like in its design as they didn’t want to introduce its complexity. But they did include additional sensors like a motion sensor to help clarify intent of the user for things like wanting to open the back door of a car versus the trunk.
Of course, being a connected accessory, it was critical that the device work. The team did some extensive thinking around the electronics and sensor components in the Nymi and went as far as cutting out components and putting them on the skin to see how they would interact with the body. Martin indicated that designing for ECG (electrocardiography) which is the main sensor posed a whole suite of design challenges including the choice of material, water resistance and even where to put the electrodes.
Outside of the hardware, Bionym is also designing and creating the ecosystem necessary for the Nymi to succeed. Martin told the audience that the team is busy working on partnerships and pilots in the payment, hotel, travel and hospitality. And indicated that new entrants into the wearable payment space, like Apple with its recent Apple Watch announcement, would only help to accelerate these types of opportunities in the market. 

The Challenge of Designing A Biometric Wearable for the Body

The Nymi is a connected wristband that uses your heart beat to prove who you are to other connected things. The wristband offers persistent identity at a time when we are constantly having to provide proof of who we are online and off using cards from our wallet, pins and passwords. CEO and Co-founder Karl Martin took to the stage yesterday at the end of Day 1 at the Designers of Things conference to talk to the crowd about the design journey for the Nymi and the challenges they worked through in designing for the human body.

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Three of Tech’s Hottest Trends Collide Tomorrow at Designers of Things
The world is changing. 3D printing is bringing manufacturing to the masses, the Internet is spreading out from our computers to connect all things in the Internet of Things and we are starting to get even more intimate with our technology by wearing it as clothing and accessories with wearable tech. These three shifts all have huge individual impacts on how we live our everyday lives as well as have influence on each other. One of the common threads between 3D printing, IoT and wearable tech is the ability to use this technology to design solutions that solve for real problems in our world which is at the core of tomorrow’s conference in San Francisco, Designers of Things.
[[MORE]]Beginning tomorrow, the Mission Bay Conference Center in downtown San Francisco will be the home to three of the hottest topics in technology today. Designers of Things is bringing together designers, developers and innovators in an event that is jam packed with live demos, technical sessions and networking parties.
We’ve spent the past few months featuring many of the speakers who are voicing their thoughts and experience at the conference these next two days. Most recently was a conversation with Duann Scott from Shapeways who spoke to us about his experience in “making really cool things” with 3D printing when brands like Hasbro open up their IP to the creative community. The Shapeways-Hasbro partnership allowed select designers to collaborate with the uber popular “My Little Pony” franchise in building new creations under this brand and selling it on the Shapeways platform.
Back in July, we caught up with Karl Martin, CEO and Founder of Toronto-based Bionym, a wearable tech company behind the Nymi, a wristband to identify who you are and then relays your identity to any connected thing via Bluetooth. As Martin explained, identity isn’t just about security and passwords but also about preferences and customization opening up opportunities to use the Nymi to do anything from opening smart doors and accessing your email to changing the music station and lighting in an environment you walk into while wearing it. 
“Sensing” environments is something Adam Justice from GridConnect knows well. In a recent featured speaker post, Justice talked to us about ConnectSense, his company’s line of sensors for the home which track anything from motion to light. And we spent considerable time discussing the importance of a great first experience for new technology, which he explained, was striving to make technology “stupid easy” for the end user so that they are not overwhelmed. 
Scott, Martin and Justice all join us beginning tomorrow as we continue these types of conversations live on stage in San Francisco. For those of you who are not able to make it to the conference, we will be live tweeting from the @DoThingsCon Twitter account and posting featured sessions on the blog so be sure to follow-us and check back here soon.

Three of Tech’s Hottest Trends Collide Tomorrow at Designers of Things

The world is changing. 3D printing is bringing manufacturing to the masses, the Internet is spreading out from our computers to connect all things in the Internet of Things and we are starting to get even more intimate with our technology by wearing it as clothing and accessories with wearable tech. These three shifts all have huge individual impacts on how we live our everyday lives as well as have influence on each other. One of the common threads between 3D printing, IoT and wearable tech is the ability to use this technology to design solutions that solve for real problems in our world which is at the core of tomorrow’s conference in San Francisco, Designers of Things.

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Apple Enters The Wearable Category With The Apple Watch
Apple held its expected September event in Cupertino today. Among the announcements was the reveal of the new iPhone 6 including one with a larger 5.5 inch screen called the iPhone 6 Plus.  Apple also entered the mobile payments by including NFC on the latest devices and rolling out a feature called ApplePay. But it was when Tim Cook spoke the magic words “One More Thing” at the tail end of the event when things really got exciting. Cook presented a line of Apple Watches at the event officiating the rumours that the company was joining others in creating products for the wearable tech category.  
[[MORE]]The Apple Watch comes in a variety of styles and colors to offer personalization and options for wearers to fit their sense of style. The watch will be offered in two sizes and feature six different straps made from various materials including leather, silicon and stainless steel. Apple will be selling three three different collections of the watch: Apple Watch, Apple Watch Sport and Apple Watch Edition, the latter  made using 18-karat gold. On top of the hardware options, Apple also featured a variety of watchfaces to choose from including a classic Mickey Mouse watch you may have remembered from the iPod Nano days.
The Apple Watch features some new and familiar inputs to interact with the software on the device. The Digital Crown on the side of the watch lets you navigate within an app and when pressed can take you back to the home screen. The other physical button under it opens up a screen with your favourite contacts for you to interact with. The screen itself is a touch screen which lets you tap and swipe but its outfitted with a new technology Apple calls Force Touch which allows the screen distinguish between a tap and a hard tap acting almost like a right click of a mouse. Finally, Siri is integrated with the watch letting you use voice to access information. 
The Watch presents some interesting way to communicate such as its Digital Touch feature which lets you send doodles and even your heartbeat to another wearer. And responding to text messages is made easy on the device through the use of predictive canned responses and a strong emphasis on the use of animated emojis. The Watch also features calling functionality with the built-in speaker and microphone.
The two immediate killer features for the device were around health and payments. The newly announced ApplePay system which allows users to pay with credit and debit cards kept in Apple’s Passbook will work on the smartwatch. And Apple unveiled two new fitness and health apps for the Watch which make use of the heart rate monitoring and activity tracking functions it comes equipped with.
But payments and health are only the tipping point for the Apple Watch as Apple also announced WatchKit to help developers build apps for the device. Apps have already been created by Starwood Hotels, to open hotel room doors with the watch, Twitter and Facebook and we are sure to see a lot more by the time the watch is ready in 2015.

Apple Enters The Wearable Category With The Apple Watch

Apple held its expected September event in Cupertino today. Among the announcements was the reveal of the new iPhone 6 including one with a larger 5.5 inch screen called the iPhone 6 Plus.  Apple also entered the mobile payments by including NFC on the latest devices and rolling out a feature called ApplePay. But it was when Tim Cook spoke the magic words “One More Thing” at the tail end of the event when things really got exciting. Cook presented a line of Apple Watches at the event officiating the rumours that the company was joining others in creating products for the wearable tech category.  

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Opening Ceremony To Debut Smart Bracelet at New York Fashion Week
Back in January, Intel announced that they were working with Open Ceremony to create fashionable wearable tech that would be available for sale at Barneys. This week we learned that Opening Ceremony will debut this tech as part of its Spring/Summer 2015 Fashion Show at New York Fashion Week.  
[[MORE]]The duo have created MICA, a smart bracelet that is as much fashion first as it is a device with “communications capabilities”. Powered by Intel, MICA, which stands for "My Intelligent Communication Accessory", marries luxurious design elements like semi-precious gems and snakeskin with technology to work with, and not against, a woman’s sense of style. Opening Ceremony has made two styles available for the smartband. One style will feature black watersnake skin, pearls from China, and lapis stones from Madagascar, while the other style will feature white watersnake skin, tiger’s eye from South Africa, and obsidian from Russia. Both boast a curved sapphire glass display. 
On the tech side, MICA offers mainly a host of notification features including the ability to read text messages, get meeting alerts and other general notifications. But Intel did indicate in its press release yesterday that “additional features and functionalities to be revealed at a later date.”
MICA will be available at select Barneys and Opening Ceremony stores by holiday 2014. Pricing was not announced but from the sounds of the premium materials of these accessories, and the choice of store, we can assume the price tag is going to be a higher one.

Opening Ceremony To Debut Smart Bracelet at New York Fashion Week

Back in January, Intel announced that they were working with Open Ceremony to create fashionable wearable tech that would be available for sale at Barneys. This week we learned that Opening Ceremony will debut this tech as part of its Spring/Summer 2015 Fashion Show at New York Fashion Week.  

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ASUS Latest To Launch Android Wear Watch with ZenWatch
IFA is underway in Berlin and to kick off the announcements ASUS officially unveiled its first wearable device, the Android Wear powered smartwatch, ZenWatch. The ZenWatch is just one of many smartwatches and other wearables expected to be launched at this event.
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ASUS has chosen to go with a classic timepiece look for its first watch. It features a 2.5D curved glass face and uses a soft genuine stitched-leather strap with quick-release clasp. The watch will come with a selection of interchangeable watchface apps for users to switch things up.
The ZenWatch features a version of the ASUS ZenUI which was specifically designed for the watch. It also features some pretty engaging elements, most not yet found on other Android Wear smartwatches. Users will be able to tap the watch to unlock a device or perform a pre-set function. It also comes equipped with remote camera capabilities and a means to control presentations. Of course it adds even more functionality to owners of ASUS smartphones. 
The ZenWatch is also an activity tracker, using its 9-axis sensor along with the companion ASUS ZenUI Wellness app to monitor activity, heart  rate, exercise intensity and relaxation levels. 

ASUS Latest To Launch Android Wear Watch with ZenWatch

IFA is underway in Berlin and to kick off the announcements ASUS officially unveiled its first wearable device, the Android Wear powered smartwatch, ZenWatch. The ZenWatch is just one of many smartwatches and other wearables expected to be launched at this event.

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