DVF Sits Down With Glass Lead Designer To Talk Fashion
Diane Von Furstenberg has had a long history with Google Glass. She debuted Google’s first wearable device on the runway of 2012’s Fashion Week followed by some exclusive videos shot of the event using the device. DVF is back with Glass now as a designer, joining forces with Glass’ lead designer, Isabelle Olsson, to create some fashionable frames for female Explorers. 
[[MORE]]DVF and Olsson sit down in the latest YouTube video from Glass to talk about how far the device has come since launch. Olsson describes the earlier prototypes of Glass as a “scuba mask with a phone attached to it and a cable running down to a back pack” and says that Glass really transformed over the course of the last year and a half beginning with the unisex frames Google launched at the start of 2013. 
The Google + DVF partnership is an important step for Glass as they try to make Glass more fashionable and wearable especially for women. You can catch the entire conversation including DVF showing off a couple of her designs in the video below. 

DVF Sits Down With Glass Lead Designer To Talk Fashion

Diane Von Furstenberg has had a long history with Google Glass. She debuted Google’s first wearable device on the runway of 2012’s Fashion Week followed by some exclusive videos shot of the event using the device. DVF is back with Glass now as a designer, joining forces with Glass’ lead designer, Isabelle Olsson, to create some fashionable frames for female Explorers. 

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Google Provides Insight Into Developing for Android Wear

Last month, Google announced that they will be extending the Android platform to wearables through Android Wear. This much anticipated operating system for wearables will be require a different development mindset than Android devices. Android Engineer Sagar Seth gave some insight and tips for developing using Android Wear in the “Ask A Dev” series from Mashable answering the question “What does a developer need to know about Android Wear?”

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Wearables Impact On Our Everyday Lives (VIDEO)
It’s no secret that we are a fan of the Creator’s Project series on wearables. This partnership between Intel and Vice has produced some thought-provoking videos on the impact of wearable technology. Their latest video focuses on how wearables will change our everyday life through context, connectivity and sensors.
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We have become quite addicted to being connected. Wearables promise this connectivity but in a manner that is more natural and integrated in our everyday lives. The use of sensors to better know ourselves and the world around us combined with much smarter and more contextual algorithms will shift our need to pull information from the internet to having this information being presented when we need it at the time. This will let us live and enjoy our life without the need to disrupt and interrupt it to check a smartphone, tablet or computer. ”We really need to rethink and redesign human computer interaction and make sure it is less people that have to adapt to technology but the technology becomes more adaptive to people,” explains MIT Professor Pattie Maes in the video.
But wearables go far beyond connecting us to the ever-growing ecosystem of the Internet of Things. The experts in this video hypothesize that wearables will extend our senses and our ability to express ourselves which will allow us to communicate with each other in ways we haven’t yet been able to achieve. “We are going to see products that are going to start being able to help us express ourselves better and help us surface our expressions and our needs,” explains Theo Forbath, VP of Frogdesign. “I think that is an interesting opportunity for product designers to start solving for”.
As wearables become more robust, invisible and understood they will become more a part of our everyday lives. Watch how this will all unfold in the full episode from the Creators Project.

Wearables Impact On Our Everyday Lives (VIDEO)

It’s no secret that we are a fan of the Creator’s Project series on wearables. This partnership between Intel and Vice has produced some thought-provoking videos on the impact of wearable technology. Their latest video focuses on how wearables will change our everyday life through context, connectivity and sensors.

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Wearable Tech Accelerator Launches Four New Google Glass Apps
CFC Media Lab’s ideaBOOST & Mind Pirate just wrapped up a 3-month bootcamp for wearable tech focusing on building applications for Google Glass. The accelerator was the first of its kind to focus on developing games and consumer apps for the smart glass market. Last week they celebrated the launch of four apps from its first cohort including a fitness app, two games and a photography app. 
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The four apps are a great example of what can be done using Google’s first wearable tech making good use of the device’s heads-up display and sensors. 
A to B is an app that turns any fitness activity into a race. The app records routes during any activity from walking, running to skateboarding and then lets you race against these results.

Little Bandits is a turn-based duelling game where you and your opponent choose two moves and then watch it all play out. Aim, shoot or dodge each other in this arcade-style Wild West.

SHARD is a camera app that lets you apply live filters to create fun and inspiring pictures with Glass. The app has eight filters including a great zoom feature which is lacking on the default Glass camera.

State of Syn: Singularity is an action packed puzzle that turns you into a hacker who needs to save the lives of an elite teams of freedom fighters. The app combines video storytelling and head-control gameplay to create a challenging strategy game.  

All four apps are available for download for Google Glass Explorers on the ideaBOOST website.
Photos from CFC Media Lab/ideaBOOST

Wearable Tech Accelerator Launches Four New Google Glass Apps

CFC Media Lab’s ideaBOOST & Mind Pirate just wrapped up a 3-month bootcamp for wearable tech focusing on building applications for Google Glass. The accelerator was the first of its kind to focus on developing games and consumer apps for the smart glass market. Last week they celebrated the launch of four apps from its first cohort including a fitness app, two games and a photography app. 

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People Don’t Want to Buy Tech at Tiffanys Just Yet
The line between technology and jewellery may be blurring with smartwatches, smart rings and other wearable technology but consumers aren’t yet ready to buy their tech at jewellery stores. This is one of the findings the Jewelry Consumer Opinion Council (JCOC) found in a recent survey on wearable tech.
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The organization reached out to over 600 participants to better understand what consumer preferences were with this new wave of computing. They found that durability, convenience and ease-of-use were the most important components for any wearable technology. And that, given the choice, they preferred something that looked more like a traditional piece of jewellery rather than something high tech.
Although a high tech look of the device may not be preferred, shopping for a wearable at a tech store was. Almost 50 percent of respondents said they would prefer to buy wearable technology from a store such as Radio Shack or Sharper Image or 47% from an internet only retailer and 46% from a big box store like Target or Walmart. The least preferred retailer were local independent jewellers.
Watches, wristbands and bracelets were the most coveted of wearable tech jewellery according to the study.

People Don’t Want to Buy Tech at Tiffanys Just Yet

The line between technology and jewellery may be blurring with smartwatches, smart rings and other wearable technology but consumers aren’t yet ready to buy their tech at jewellery stores. This is one of the findings the Jewelry Consumer Opinion Council (JCOC) found in a recent survey on wearable tech.

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Bonobos Launches TechStyle: The First Fashionable Shirt That Knows You
New York based men’s eRetailer, Bonobos, may have finally cracked the code when it comes to fashionable wearable tech. The company announced the launch of TechStyle, the first fashionable wearable shirt that fits your life. And we are super impressed with all its features!
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Wearables have been criticized for not being fashionable enough so we are thrilled to see a clothing company jump into this space and hit it out of the ballpark. 
“These days fashion isn’t just about how your favourite shirt fits and looks but what it does,” said Lars Soderquist, Head of Wearables. “That’s why we are excited to annouce Bonobos TechStyle - wearable technology that fits your life”.
TechStyles features Wi-Fiber which keeps you constantly connected to the outside world; smart fabrics which keeps tab on your wellbeing and is integrated with your social networks.
But hands-down our favorite features are the body gestures, especially the one-shake payment method, and the slient alarm.

Introducing Bonobos TechStyles Video
JUST KIDDING »»»»»> APRIL FOOLS!

Bonobos Launches TechStyle: The First Fashionable Shirt That Knows You

New York based men’s eRetailer, Bonobos, may have finally cracked the code when it comes to fashionable wearable tech. The company announced the launch of TechStyle, the first fashionable wearable shirt that fits your life. And we are super impressed with all its features!

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Becoming Superhuman Through Wearable Tech (VIDEO)
It is part of the human condition to always want to improve ourselves. With wearable technology we are able to combine biology with technology to augment ourselves in an almost superhuman fashion. This is the theme of the fourth instalment of the Creator’s Project Make it Wearable video.
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Using wearables to provide capabilities and senses for people who have lost these or were born without is just one of the ways this new technology can really benefit us. 
Craig Hutto suffered a shark attack in Florida when he was a child had to have his leg amputated, He now wears a Vanderbilt powered prosthesis which uses motors in the knee and the ankle. These motors act as the muscles in this replacement limb which give him the power to climb stairs and use his leg in a more natural manner. 
Neil Harbisson began an experiment with wearable cameras back in 2004 when he wanted to augment his inability to see color. Using cameras which then translate each color into sound, Harbisson is able to hear each color as it is presented in front of him. He explains on the video that his hope was to be able to perceive color just as good as everyone around him but it ended up that this machine-enabled color detection now allows him to understand color far better than the average person.
"We are going to have to some serious conversations about when will people elect to include computing inside our bodies,. We should always be looking at wearables in concert as they work together with our bodies and overall are they helping us to be better human beings," Intel Futurist Steve Brown says in this latest video.
This is another great spot on the impact wearables can have on our everyday lives. Check out the full video below.

Becoming Superhuman Through Wearable Tech (VIDEO)

It is part of the human condition to always want to improve ourselves. With wearable technology we are able to combine biology with technology to augment ourselves in an almost superhuman fashion. This is the theme of the fourth instalment of the Creator’s Project Make it Wearable video.

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Augmented and Virtual Reality Market Worth $1.06 Billion by 2018
A new report on augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) shows that this space is expected to grow over 15% from 2013 to 2018 reaching over $1 billion dollars by 2018. And this is just for dedicated AR/VR systems.
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The report, by leading global market research and consulting company MarketsandMarkets, describes augmented reality as a thriving technology which has shown growth so far using mobile phone technology, cameras and GPS. It estimates that by 2015, AR will widely be used in the education field for advanced learning and teaching. 
Among the major drivers the report cites for growth are the advancements in technology, such as wearables, internet connectivity and an increased demand for AR/VR applications in the medical field.
North America and Europe are marked as geographic market leaders in the AR/VR space with some of the major companies to watch include Total Immersion (France), Qualcomm (US), Metaio (Germany), Vuzix (US), Layar (The Netherlands) and Wikitude (Germany).

Augmented and Virtual Reality Market Worth $1.06 Billion by 2018

A new report on augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) shows that this space is expected to grow over 15% from 2013 to 2018 reaching over $1 billion dollars by 2018. And this is just for dedicated AR/VR systems.

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Ring Wants To Be The One Wearable To Rule Them All
Turning your lights on with the flick of a finger may be something you would expect to read in a Harry Potter novel rather than see on a page in Kickstarter, but a new wearable, Ring, is making it happen. 
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Ring uses ultra-small finger gesture recognition technology to control your smart home, smartphone or any connected thing. Tapping on the ring activates the device to start to identify the gesture you draw with your finger. Gestures are predefined or can be edited or created using the Ring smartphone app. 
Imagine controlling your Phillips Hue lights simply by drawing a lightbulb or changing the song playing on your smartphone by gesturing a music note. Ring’s gesture recognition is so precise that it can even identify letters which means drawing text in mid-air can be used to write a message.
Although the predominant body part for wearables today is still the wrist, we have seen a number of finger-based solutions enter the market. Last week, we saw Fin wrap up its Indiegogo campaign for a wearable ring that turns your palm into a numeric keyboard and gesture interface. And back in August, the NFC ring successfully funded on Kickstarter.
It looks as though Ring has resonated more with users, perhaps due to the simplistic design and its robust feature set it. Ring has already raised over $665,000 on Kickstarter, on course to triple the $250,000 funding goal it has set for the campaign which ends on April 4. 

Ring Wants To Be The One Wearable To Rule Them All

Turning your lights on with the flick of a finger may be something you would expect to read in a Harry Potter novel rather than see on a page in Kickstarter, but a new wearable, Ring, is making it happen. 

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The Google Glass of Helmets Wins at SXSW 
SXSW’s sixth annual accelerator pitch event wrapped up on Sunday with over 500 companies applied, 18 finalists and 6 winners. Taking home the big win in the Wearables category this year was the Google Glass for motorcyclists, the Skully Helmet.
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Skully Helmet is a motorcycle helmet with an integrated heads-up display (HUD) that provides navigational information as well as blind spot data. The helmet has a 180-degree rear view camera so the driver can see what is coming up behind them while keeping their eyes on the road.
The device uses Bluetooth to pair with the driver’s smartphone. This integration enables hands-free access to the smartphone’s music, phone and text messaging features leveraging voice control. 
It’s interesting to see a heads-up display specific for driving in light of the backlash Google Glass has received when used in the car, but this isn’t the first wearable HUD for people on the move. Vancouver’s Recon Instruments has already seen success with its HUD for snowboarders and skiers, the Recon Snow. And Recon’s upcoming wearable for bicyclists, the Recon Jet, is a much anticipated device for later this year.Skully Helmets will be on sale later this year. Pricing has not yet been announced. Beta Skully AR-1 helmets will be made available sooner to select beta testers for Summer 2014. 

The Google Glass of Helmets Wins at SXSW 

SXSW’s sixth annual accelerator pitch event wrapped up on Sunday with over 500 companies applied, 18 finalists and 6 winners. Taking home the big win in the Wearables category this year was the Google Glass for motorcyclists, the Skully Helmet.

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Wearables As A Form of Human Expression [VIDEO]
The Creator’s Project is back with the third episode in its “Make It Wearable” YouTube series which explores the impact of wearable technology from various angles. This video focuses on the intersection of wearable tech and fashion in creating new opportunities for human expression.
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Most of the wearable gadgets on the market today have been criticized for being too disconnected from fashion, making them less wearable. “Wearable technology is going to have to be fashionable and cool to move from being wearable to being worn,” Steve Brown, Futurist at Intel explains.
But it isn’t just the tech startups and giants who are trying to tackle this new space. The fashion industry is also learning how to use technology to unfetter its creativity to make new wares. 
As one designer explains, fashion and technology is going through an “oil and water” moment when it comes to wearables but the separation will need to dissolve and finally disappear in order for wearables to succeed.
The Creator’s Project showcases artists, fashion designers and leading wearable DIY resource, Ada Fruit, on the use of technology in enabling a new form of expression in garments, accessories and even cosmetics. The focus on function as much as comfortability and design makes us excited for the future of tech on the body. 
The full video is below. We dare you to watch it and not want to immediately attach an LED to something you wear. 

Wearables As A Form of Human Expression [VIDEO]

The Creator’s Project is back with the third episode in its “Make It Wearable” YouTube series which explores the impact of wearable technology from various angles. This video focuses on the intersection of wearable tech and fashion in creating new opportunities for human expression.

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Postscapes IoT Award Winners Announced
Internet of Things database and industry resource, Postscapes, have wrapped up their annual IoT awards and have announced the winners. The award program honours the best connected products in multiple categories as selected by the Postscapes Editorial team and voted by the People. This year’s top winners included connected home product, Neurio and connected body product, Angel Sensor. 
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Neurio is a connected home technology system that combines a sensor with the cloud and an app to turn an ordinary home smart. The Neurio sensor is connected to your home’s breaker panel and measures your home’s energy use. The sensor then sends you notifications and reports based on appliance use. 
The system is expected to start to ship later this year. A basic package, which includes a sensor, the app and free subscription to the Neurio cloud, is being offered for $249.00. 

Angel Sensor (title picture) took home the editor’s choice in the Connected Body category. Angel is the first open sensor for health and fitness which monitors activity, vitals, weight & calories, and sleep.
The wristband collects your body’s vital signs 24/7 and then sends this information to a companion app on your smartphone. The device is expected to be equipped with acoustic, optical, acceleration and temperature sensors.
Although Angel is still under development, they say that once they have completed its wearable they will be able to detect certain health conditions and warn you and your physician. Bold claims. 
But Angel Sensor and Neurio were only two winners from this year’s awards. Here are the full list of winners who took home the Editor’s Choice award:
Best Connected Home Product: Neurio
Best Connected Body Product: Angel Sensor
Best Smart City Application: Bitlock
Best Entreprise Application: HyGreen
Best Technical Enabler: Raspberry Pi
Social Impact Potential: BRCK
Best Networked Art Project: MIMMI
Best Design Fiction Project: Counting Sheep
Best IoT DIY Project: FUKUSHIMA Wheel
Best IoT Open Source Project: The Thing System
IoT Breakout Startup of the Year: NinjaBlocks
To see the companies that won People’s Choice and Runner-up head on over to the Postscapes site.

Postscapes IoT Award Winners Announced

Internet of Things database and industry resource, Postscapes, have wrapped up their annual IoT awards and have announced the winners. The award program honours the best connected products in multiple categories as selected by the Postscapes Editorial team and voted by the People. This year’s top winners included connected home product, Neurio and connected body product, Angel Sensor. 

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Wearable Technology’s Impact on Human Health (Video)
Last week we introduced you to a new YouTube series on Wearable Tech from the Creators Project, a partnership between Intel and VICE. The series just published their second episode on Human Health. In this episode, we see how wearables are empowering patients with data to help them better understand themselves and how doctors will become analysts, equipped with the information they need to make more effective prescriptions. 
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The episode showcases many projects. Among them is the Checklist helmet, a partnership between Reebok and sensor firm, mc10. The duo have created a wearable helmet which shows sports players the degree of which they have suffered a hit from other players.
A project from Northeastern University is using wearables to help understand and identify autism within children. A sensor-based device continually captures a chil’s behavior which can then be mapped to a baseline to help identify precursors used in diagnosis.
One of the most powerful quotes from this video is from Dr. Robin Berzin of Health 2.0 who says:
"When somebody comes into my office I get this one minute look into what their life looks like. I get their vital signs and a certain gestalt of what’s going on with them, whether they are doing well or they are doing poorly. But I don’t know what the other 99% of their life looks like. And that’s the most important determinant of health. Patients are going to own this data. They are going to control it. And its going to be delivered to the medical community in a way that doctor’s can actually use to help them live healthier lives".
Wearables are already doing quite well in the health sector with some estimates suggesting that activity trackers or health based wearables make up more than 60% of the market to date. So we are definitely on the path the Creators Project depicts in this series.
Watch the video here:

Wearable Technology’s Impact on Human Health (Video)

Last week we introduced you to a new YouTube series on Wearable Tech from the Creators Project, a partnership between Intel and VICE. The series just published their second episode on Human Health. In this episode, we see how wearables are empowering patients with data to help them better understand themselves and how doctors will become analysts, equipped with the information they need to make more effective prescriptions. 

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Wearable Tech Becoming More Fashionable
One of the biggest barriers for wearable tech is how it looks. Unlike smartphones that can be tucked away in our pocket, wearable technology is outwardly facing all the time and therefore cannot help but be an extension of our style. Up until recent, wearables have been void of fashion, but the tides are turning and fashion is starting to become more of a focus. 
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Most of the new fashion choices we are seeing with wearables are geared towards woman. This is especially the case since most wearables on the market today are jewellery - watches, wristbands, rings and broaches - and the market for these types of accessories is much stronger with the female demographic. 

A good example is the recent announcement of the popular activity tracker company, Fitbit, joining forces with luxury fashion designer, Tory Burch, to create a line of fashionable bracelets, pendants and wristbands to house the health sensor.
But Fitbit isn’t the only wearable trying to pose their tech as jewellery. Netatmo’s UV-measuring bracelet, June, hopes to dazzle potential buyers. This versatile jewel-centric accessory can be worn as a bracelet or broach and offers three different color choices: gold, platinum or gunmetal. The device measures sun intensity in real-time and with the help of an app monitors and alerts you when you’ve had too much for the day.
But Netatmo’s June was the first to focus on the female market. Back in October of last year, a Kickstarter campaign was started for Memi, a chic-iPhone compatible smartbracelet that notifies you of your calls, text messages and calendar alerts. The LED and tactile equipped bangle met their funding goal of $100,000 and is expected to start to ship this summer.

As wearables mature, we should expect more and more companies to take fashion just as seriously as features for their devices. In doing so, it can only help propel the success of this new form of computing much faster into the mainstream.

Wearable Tech Becoming More Fashionable

One of the biggest barriers for wearable tech is how it looks. Unlike smartphones that can be tucked away in our pocket, wearable technology is outwardly facing all the time and therefore cannot help but be an extension of our style. Up until recent, wearables have been void of fashion, but the tides are turning and fashion is starting to become more of a focus. 

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Making Computing More Human With Wearable Tech [VIDEO]
We have always augmented our human experience. From furs, to swords and shields, to reading glasses and pocket watches - we have made things that make us do more than we could naturally. A new webisode from Intel in partnership with Vice looks at how the next wave of computing, wearable technology, will augment our human communication.
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"We are increasingly reliant on our digital devices for nearly every aspect of our lives," Patti Maes MIT Media Lab explains in the video. “The only natural future for this is that these digital devices become almost a part of us. So we try to design devices that can be used while you are…doing other things”.
The video highlights projects from MIT Media Lab’s “SixthSense”, the Buddy Cup and a mobile journalist who sees wearables as a critical piece in covering breaking news.  
This five-minute spot will leave you more informed and excited about where we are headed with wearables.  Human Communication is the first of a series called “Make It Wearable” developed by the Creators Project, a partnership between Intel and VICE.
You can watch it here: 

Making Computing More Human With Wearable Tech [VIDEO]

We have always augmented our human experience. From furs, to swords and shields, to reading glasses and pocket watches - we have made things that make us do more than we could naturally. A new webisode from Intel in partnership with Vice looks at how the next wave of computing, wearable technology, will augment our human communication.

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