3D Printing Headed to International Space Station This Summer
Astronauts will soon be able to 3D print Yoda heads miles above Earth as the first 3D printer designed to work in outer space has received clearance from NASA to head to the International Space Station (ISS).
[[MORE]]The 3D printer, created by Made In Space, recently completed a series of tests by NASA who has now certified that the device is safe to use on the space station. The device is scheduled to launch in August of this year.
3D printers on the space station are expected to be key tools for astronauts, giving them the ability to create necessary items on-demand which could help save time, money and space aboard rockets. 
“As NASA ventures further into space, whether redirecting an asteroid or sending humans to Mars, we’ll need transformative technology to reduce cargo weight and volume,” NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said during a recent tour of the agency’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif. “In the future, perhaps astronauts will be able to print the tools or components they need while in space.”
Made in Space’s 3D printer will be used to facilitate an experiment to see how additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) performs in zero gravity. Once installed on the space station, the device is scheduled to print 21 demonstration parts including a series of parts and tools. The initial printing of the parts will be reviewed by the Made In Space team via HD video downlink to determine the success of the extrusion process in microgravity. The parts will then return to earth for ground analysis.  
A 3D printer is subsequently planned to be permanently installed on the ISS incorporating the lessons learned from the completed experiment and further capabilities such as additional material options and larger build volume.
“When we started Made In Space in 2010, we laid out a large, audacious vision for changing space exploration by bringing manufacturing to space,” said Jason Dunn, Chief Technology Officer for Made In Space. “We’ve systematically pursued that vision by testing 3D printing in microgravity on parabolic flights, designing a printer for those conditions, and, now, flying our 3D printer to the ISS. Passing these tests means that we’ve achieved another milestone. We’re nearing the culmination of the first stage of our larger vision.”
Image Source: Made in Space

3D Printing Headed to International Space Station This Summer

Astronauts will soon be able to 3D print Yoda heads miles above Earth as the first 3D printer designed to work in outer space has received clearance from NASA to head to the International Space Station (ISS).

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Stars Shine Brighter Through Google Glass with Stardroid

Adam Wilson, co-founder of Orbotix or the team that brought us Sphero - the robotic game for iOS and Android, is now harnessing the sky with Google Glass. Wilson and his team have developed Glassware that uses Google’s Sky Map called Stardroid. The app essentially identifies star constellations as you look up into the sky. 

Wilson says “Some people will say that you can do this exact same thing with your smartphone, and we agree you can. But what fascinates us about this is a constant stream of information about our world, in real time, with little or no effort on our part. We can imagine apps like Google Googles, and other augmented reality apps and games becoming extremely valid in a world where they were just neat to show off on a phone. Nobody holds their phone up looking through the camera as they walk around – it’s just hard to do”.

The app is a little tricky to install but you can find more information here.

Space Dog Sunday!
Thought this was a fun way to end the weekend. What do you think?
ben-newman-illustration:

The brilliant James Wilson (Jambonbon) has also animated another character from my next book, ‘Professor Astro Cat’s Frontiers of Space’, with Dr Dominic Walliman available to buy HERE. This time Emmet the dog is whizzing along the surface of Mars in his own flying saucer. 

Space Dog Sunday!

Thought this was a fun way to end the weekend. What do you think?

ben-newman-illustration:

The brilliant James Wilson (Jambonbon) has also animated another character from my next book, ‘Professor Astro Cat’s Frontiers of Space’, with Dr Dominic Walliman available to buy HERE. This time Emmet the dog is whizzing along the surface of Mars in his own flying saucer. 

European Space Agency aims to perfect 3D printing of metal parts within five years
Like NASA, the European Space Agency is actively pursuing 3D-printed metal components for use in spacecraft, planes, and even nuclear fusion applications. The ESA has unveiled printed parts made from metal that it says can withstand temperatures of up to 3500°C, far beyond the limits of plastic, the traditional 3D printing ingredient. This makes the resulting parts “fit for space and the most demanding applications on Earth,” according to the ESA. 
Read more: European Space Agency aims to perfect 3D printing of metal parts within five years

European Space Agency aims to perfect 3D printing of metal parts within five years

Like NASA, the European Space Agency is actively pursuing 3D-printed metal components for use in spacecraft, planes, and even nuclear fusion applications. The ESA has unveiled printed parts made from metal that it says can withstand temperatures of up to 3500°C, far beyond the limits of plastic, the traditional 3D printing ingredient. This makes the resulting parts “fit for space and the most demanding applications on Earth,” according to the ESA. 

Read more: European Space Agency aims to perfect 3D printing of metal parts within five years

(via thisistheverge)

Nasa plans first 3D printer space launch in 2014

US space agency Nasa is planning to launch a 3D printer into space next year to help astronauts manufacture spare parts and tools in zero gravity.

It will be the first time a 3D printer has been used in space and could help reduce the costs of future missions.

The device will have to withstand lift-off vibrations and operate safely in an enclosed space station environment.

Nasa has chosen technology start-up Made in Space to make the microwave oven-sized printer.

"Imagine an astronaut needing to make a life-or-death repair on the International Space Station," said Aaron Kemmer, the company’s chief executive.

"Rather than hoping that the necessary parts and tools are on the station already, what if the parts could be 3D printed when they needed them?"

"If you want to be adaptable, you have to be able to design and manufacture on the fly, and that’s where 3D printing in space comes in,” said Dave Korsmeyer, director of engineering at Nasa’s Ames Research Center.

Nasa is also experimenting with 3D printing small satellites that could be launched from the International Space Station and then transmit data to earth.

Additive manufacturing, as 3D printing is also known, builds up objects layer by layer, commonly using polymer materials.

But laser-melted titanium and nickel-chromium powders are now being used to build much stronger components.

In August, Nasa successfully tested a metal 3D printed rocket component as part of its drive to reduce the costs of space exploration.

source 

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Future Tech Report Hits 3,500 
Thanks to all the Future Geeks out there!
We hit 3,500 today which means there are LOADS of us out there with a heart-on for robots, cyborgs and 3D printed wonders! Keep sharing! 

Future Tech Report Hits 3,500 

Thanks to all the Future Geeks out there!

We hit 3,500 today which means there are LOADS of us out there with a heart-on for robots, cyborgs and 3D printed wonders! Keep sharing! 

Missed the LADEE Lunar Probe Launch? Watch It Here!

What is LADEE? The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is designed to study the Moon’s thin exosphere. From what I understand, one of the big missions for this probe is to solve a 40-year old space mystery as to what moon dust is all about! Seriously!

Here is the mission overview from NASA:

NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE, pronounced like “laddie”) is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust. A thorough understanding of these characteristics will address long-standing unknowns, and help scientists understand other planetary bodies as well.

The LADEE spacecraft will be launched on a Minotaur V vehicle during a five-day launch period that opens on Sept. 6, 2013.

The LADEE mission is divided into mission phases: Launch, Ascent, Activation and Checkout, Phasing Orbits, Lunar Orbit Insertion, Commissioning, Science, and Decommissioning.

Once launched, LADEE will enter a series of phasing orbits, which allows the spacecraft to arrive at the moon at the proper time and phase. This approach accommodates any dispersion in the Minotaur V launch injection.

LADEE’s arrival at the moon depends on the launch date. The spacecraft will approach the moon from its leading edge, travel behind the moon out of sight of the Earth, and then re-emerge and execute a three-minute Lunar Orbit Insertion maneuver. This will place LADEE in an elliptical retrograde equatorial orbit with an orbital period of approximately 24 hours.

A series of maneuvers is then performed to reduce the orbit to become nearly circular with a 156-mile (250-kilometer) altitude.

The 100-day Science Phase is performed at an orbit that will vary between 20–60 kilometers due to the moon’s “lumpy” gravity field. During the Science Phase, the moon will rotate more than three times underneath the LADEE orbit.

Following the Science Phase, a decommissioning period is planned, during which the altitude will be managed down to lower altitudes, after which the spacecraft will impact the lunar surface.”

3D Printers Will Help Astronaut Build Colonies on Mars

via: wildcat2030:

ZA Architects Propose an Underground Colony on Mars

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With the advent of technologies such as 3D printers that can operate in space and genetically engineered brick-forming bacteria, the idea of building a colony of Mars no longer seem so far-fetched. The German firm, ZA Architects is proposing plans for a large, underground network of caverns to begin the population of the Red Planet. Relying primarily on robots, the machines will pave the way for humans to eventually live on Earth’s neighbor.

Around Saturn from fabio di donato on Vimeo.

Around Saturn - Stunning Images Around Saturn’s Rings

This video shows a selection from more than 200.000 pictures taken by the Cassini Spacecraft around Saturn’s Rings in a period between 2004 and 2012, published through the Planetary Data System between June 2005 and June 2013 - If you want to know more about the mission please visit saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/This video shows a selection from more than 200.000 pictures taken by the Cassini Spacecraft around Saturn’s Rings in a period between 2004 and 2012, published through the Planetary Data System between June 2005 and June 2013 - If you want to know more about the mission please visit saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/

NASA’s low-cost 3D-printed rocket injector withstands test firing
NASA has successfully tested its first rocket engine component made through 3D printing. On Thursday, NASA subjected its new rocket engine injector to a series of high-pressure fire tests involving liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen, demonstrating that additive manufacturing (its official name) could one day help the agency build the next generation of rockets faster and at lower cost. 
via: thisistheverge:

NASA’s low-cost 3D-printed rocket injector withstands test firing

NASA has successfully tested its first rocket engine component made through 3D printing. On Thursday, NASA subjected its new rocket engine injector to a series of high-pressure fire tests involving liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen, demonstrating that additive manufacturing (its official name) could one day help the agency build the next generation of rockets faster and at lower cost. 

via: thisistheverge:

NASA GROVER solar-powered robot covers harsh Greenland terrain
"A new NASA robot called GROVER that carries ground-penetrating radar for measuring and analyzing layers of snow and ice has survived its first test in the Arctic, proving that it can operate autonomously as a rolling scientific discovery bot in the harsh polar environment.”
via: treehugger

NASA GROVER solar-powered robot covers harsh Greenland terrain

"A new NASA robot called GROVER that carries ground-penetrating radar for measuring and analyzing layers of snow and ice has survived its first test in the Arctic, proving that it can operate autonomously as a rolling scientific discovery bot in the harsh polar environment.”

via: treehugger