The Toothbrush Gets Connected with Kolibree
The Internet of Things is starting to reach a vast array of objects. At CES we saw connected hair dryers, connected doorbells and Kolibree, the World’s First Connected Toothbrush.
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Kolibree has been called the “Fitbit for Teeth”. The electric toothbrush not only helps you clean your teeth, but monitors, analyzes and even rewards your brushing habit. The toothbrush collects data such as the time spent brushing and the areas in your mouth you’ve cleaned and sends that data to a free smartphone application.
One app can house up to five toothbrushes which is perfect for families. You can share your data between family members and even your dentist or keep it private. One of the best features for kids is the earning of badges and other rewards to gamify the brushing experience which can help encourage better dental hygiene in a fun and engaging way.
The toothbrush can last up to one week of brushing with four brushes a day with Bluetooth turned on before having to be put on the magnetic charging base.
According to DigitalTrends, the company will be releasing a number of toothbrush models ranging in price between $100-$200 in the third quarter of this year, possibly as a Kickstarter campaign to begin with.

The Toothbrush Gets Connected with Kolibree

The Internet of Things is starting to reach a vast array of objects. At CES we saw connected hair dryers, connected doorbells and Kolibree, the World’s First Connected Toothbrush.

Read More

Nissan Google Glass Competitor, 3E?

A concept video of a HUD display, Google Glass competitor from Nissan was released by the company. The video doesn’t get into any specifications or features. But from what we can see, the device looks very much like Glass except much more geometric and the prism seems to sit at eye level rather than just above the eye like Google’s Glass.

The countdown suggests that we will find out what the 3E is all about in just over 8 days (8 days 18 hours 26 minutes and counting to be exact). The announcement is expected to be made at the 43rd Tokyo Motorshow 

More images of the concept model can be found on Nissan Japan’s web page.

This is isn’t the first wearable tech Nissan has teased us with. Back in September, Nissan released a trailer for their Nissan Nismo Smartwatch. But we have yet to hear of anything move past the concept stage from the car manufacturer.

#FutureHome Nutrima

Electrolux Design Lab 2013

Nutrima calculates the nutritional values, possible toxins and freshness of your food. The appliance is foldable, easy to bring along and supported by an app mapping your experiences giving tips of resellers with high quality ingredients.

 www.electroluxdesignlab.com

(via internetofth)

Home 2025 - GE Appliance Design Ideas

GE has imagined the enhancements that will change the way we live and how our homes will look a dozen years from now. Four GE Appliances industrial designers describe their appliance vision for the year 2025. Learn more at http://www.geappliances.com/home2025

[via nextbigfuture]

Wearable Tech - Its Anyone’s Game: Nissan To Enter Smartwatch Space

The connected car meets the connected you with Nissan’s new smartwatch the Nissan Nismo. 

According to the press release:

· First smartwatch concept to connect driver and car
· Nismo Watch showcases Nissan’s intent to deliver biometric data that enhances driver performance and efficiency
· Nissan is investigating heart and brain monitoring technologies for future wearable tech

The watch, unveiled today ahead of its display at the Frankfurt Motor Show (10th – 22nd September 2013), is Nissan’s first step into wearable technology and epitomises its ‘fan first’ approach to performance.

The Nissan Nismo Watch will allow drivers to:

− monitor the efficiency of their vehicle with average speed and fuel consumption readings;

− access vehicle telematics and performance data while on track;

− capture biometric data via a heart rate monitor;

− connect to the car using a smartphone app via Bluetooth Low Energy;

− receive tailored car messages from Nissan;

Concept Shows Smart Home, Smart Office and Smart City

I am a sucker for concept art! Especially that which depicts the “future” . Wonder when we will all get sick of the word “smart” LOL

gaemungsmental:

Smart life in CeBIT 2011 / Composite graphic

designed by gaemung

Customizable smart lamp wakes up users during light sleep phases
Getting up in the morning isn’t easy – or helped by irritating beepers. We’ve already seen the Uniqlo Wake Up app tailor its alarm to the weather each day, and now the iwaku is a smartphone-connected lamp that eases sleepers into the morning by detecting light sleep phases. READ MORE…
via: springwise

Customizable smart lamp wakes up users during light sleep phases

Getting up in the morning isn’t easy – or helped by irritating beepers. We’ve already seen the Uniqlo Wake Up app tailor its alarm to the weather each day, and now the iwaku is a smartphone-connected lamp that eases sleepers into the morning by detecting light sleep phases. READ MORE…

via: springwise

Handheld sensor detects stress and teaches users to control it
Gamification is known to be effective in encouraging positive habits when it comes to health, as devices such as the T-Haler have demonstrated. Having recently reached its funding target on Kickstarter, the PIP is a device that senses stress when held in the hand and can be used to control video game characters that teach users how to manage their anxiety. READ MORE…
via: springwise

Handheld sensor detects stress and teaches users to control it

Gamification is known to be effective in encouraging positive habits when it comes to health, as devices such as the T-Haler have demonstrated. Having recently reached its funding target on Kickstarter, the PIP is a device that senses stress when held in the hand and can be used to control video game characters that teach users how to manage their anxiety. READ MORE…

via: springwise

Collaboration Aims to Support Smart Cities
CEA-Leti today announced that a group of European and Japanese companies, research institutes, universities and cities will work together in the ClouT project to deliver ways for cities to leverage the Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud computing to become smart cities.ClouT, which stands for “cloud of things,” will develop infrastructure, services, tools and applications for municipalities and their various stakeholders – including citizens, service developers and application integrators – to create, deploy and manage user-centric applications that capitalize on the latest advances in IoT and cloud computing.Read more: www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/collaboration-aims-support-smart-cities
via: laboratoryequipment

Collaboration Aims to Support Smart Cities

CEA-Leti today announced that a group of European and Japanese companies, research institutes, universities and cities will work together in the ClouT project to deliver ways for cities to leverage the Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud computing to become smart cities.

ClouT, which stands for “cloud of things,” will develop infrastructure, services, tools and applications for municipalities and their various stakeholders – including citizens, service developers and application integrators – to create, deploy and manage user-centric applications that capitalize on the latest advances in IoT and cloud computing.

Read more: www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/collaboration-aims-support-smart-cities

via: laboratoryequipment

Smart shirt helps wearers keep track of their mental and physical wellbeing
The quantified self movement has already spawned apps such as Xpression and Soma Analytics to help users track their own moods and emotions. Looking to the future, OMsignal has developed a shirt embedded with sensors able to detect and track the wearer’s emotional state, and even share the data socially. READ MORE…

Smart shirt helps wearers keep track of their mental and physical wellbeing

The quantified self movement has already spawned apps such as Xpression and Soma Analytics to help users track their own moods and emotions. Looking to the future, OMsignal has developed a shirt embedded with sensors able to detect and track the wearer’s emotional state, and even share the data socially. READ MORE…

Wearable Tech Ain’t Just Glasses and Watches
wildcat2030:

In the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings.
Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right or left, or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.
Lynette Jones, a senior research scientist in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, designs wearable tactile displays. Through her work, she’s observed that the skin is a sensitive — though largely untapped — medium for communication.
“If you compare the skin to the retina, you have about the same number of sensory receptors, you just have them over almost two square meters of space, unlike the eye where it’s all concentrated in an extremely small area,” Jones says. “The skin is generally as useful as a very acute area. It’s just that you need to disperse the information that you’re presenting.” (via Can you feel me now? - MIT News Office)

Wearable Tech Ain’t Just Glasses and Watches

wildcat2030:

In the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings.

Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right or left, or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.

Lynette Jones, a senior research scientist in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, designs wearable tactile displays. Through her work, she’s observed that the skin is a sensitive — though largely untapped — medium for communication.

“If you compare the skin to the retina, you have about the same number of sensory receptors, you just have them over almost two square meters of space, unlike the eye where it’s all concentrated in an extremely small area,” Jones says. “The skin is generally as useful as a very acute area. It’s just that you need to disperse the information that you’re presenting.” (via Can you feel me now? - MIT News Office)

‘Smart Ball’ and app help soccer players improve their game
Improving professional sports performance these days is aided by rigorous health and training regimes informed by lots of information about the individual athlete. We’ve already seen the 94Fifty bring smartphone-enabled data collection and analysis to basketball, and now the adidas Smart Ball aims to do the same for soccer. READ MORE…
via: springwise

‘Smart Ball’ and app help soccer players improve their game

Improving professional sports performance these days is aided by rigorous health and training regimes informed by lots of information about the individual athlete. We’ve already seen the 94Fifty bring smartphone-enabled data collection and analysis to basketball, and now the adidas Smart Ball aims to do the same for soccer. READ MORE…

via: springwise

The Coming Age of Networked Matter

From the Institute for the Future:

Over the next decade, a confluence of breakthroughs will give us new lenses to observe the wondrous interconnections surrounding us and within us. The coming Age of Networked Matter is a world where everyday objects will blog, robots will have social networks, microbes will talk to kitchens, and forests will “friend” cities. We will look at the emerging technologies in computation, sensing and actuation, wireless, materials science, and even biology that will underpin this coming world, and interact with creators as they reimagine and reinvent the changing context and meaning of our lives.

[via io9] [IFTF]

via: futurescope

Smart Socks Act As Your Running Coach
You call Google Glass wearable tech? Heapsylon makes sensor-rich fabric. Three former Microsoft employees believe clothing will be the computer, and to that end they invested three years of their lives building a sensor-infused material that they promptly turned into … a pair of socks.
The socks can track a runner’s steps, distance, speed and calories. The technology also serves as a “virtual coach”, detecting where you land on your feet and how you stride. There are wrong ways to run (such as overpronation), so the app aims to help you prevent injuries.
This startup is entering a growing space with more established fitness tracker competitors like the Nike+ FuelBand and the Fitbit Flex. But it’s unique that Heapsylon designed its technology in a sock, rather than a wristband.

via: radstake

Smart Socks Act As Your Running Coach

You call Google Glass wearable tech? Heapsylon makes sensor-rich fabric. Three former Microsoft employees believe clothing will be the computer, and to that end they invested three years of their lives building a sensor-infused material that they promptly turned into … a pair of socks.

The socks can track a runner’s steps, distance, speed and calories. The technology also serves as a “virtual coach”, detecting where you land on your feet and how you stride. There are wrong ways to run (such as overpronation), so the app aims to help you prevent injuries.

This startup is entering a growing space with more established fitness tracker competitors like the Nike+ FuelBand and the Fitbit Flex. But it’s unique that Heapsylon designed its technology in a sock, rather than a wristband.

via: radstake