Postscapes IoT Award Winners Announced
Internet of Things database and industry resource, Postscapes, have wrapped up their annual IoT awards and have announced the winners. The award program honours the best connected products in multiple categories as selected by the Postscapes Editorial team and voted by the People. This year’s top winners included connected home product, Neurio and connected body product, Angel Sensor. 
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Neurio is a connected home technology system that combines a sensor with the cloud and an app to turn an ordinary home smart. The Neurio sensor is connected to your home’s breaker panel and measures your home’s energy use. The sensor then sends you notifications and reports based on appliance use. 
The system is expected to start to ship later this year. A basic package, which includes a sensor, the app and free subscription to the Neurio cloud, is being offered for $249.00. 

Angel Sensor (title picture) took home the editor’s choice in the Connected Body category. Angel is the first open sensor for health and fitness which monitors activity, vitals, weight & calories, and sleep.
The wristband collects your body’s vital signs 24/7 and then sends this information to a companion app on your smartphone. The device is expected to be equipped with acoustic, optical, acceleration and temperature sensors.
Although Angel is still under development, they say that once they have completed its wearable they will be able to detect certain health conditions and warn you and your physician. Bold claims. 
But Angel Sensor and Neurio were only two winners from this year’s awards. Here are the full list of winners who took home the Editor’s Choice award:
Best Connected Home Product: Neurio
Best Connected Body Product: Angel Sensor
Best Smart City Application: Bitlock
Best Entreprise Application: HyGreen
Best Technical Enabler: Raspberry Pi
Social Impact Potential: BRCK
Best Networked Art Project: MIMMI
Best Design Fiction Project: Counting Sheep
Best IoT DIY Project: FUKUSHIMA Wheel
Best IoT Open Source Project: The Thing System
IoT Breakout Startup of the Year: NinjaBlocks
To see the companies that won People’s Choice and Runner-up head on over to the Postscapes site.

Postscapes IoT Award Winners Announced

Internet of Things database and industry resource, Postscapes, have wrapped up their annual IoT awards and have announced the winners. The award program honours the best connected products in multiple categories as selected by the Postscapes Editorial team and voted by the People. This year’s top winners included connected home product, Neurio and connected body product, Angel Sensor. 

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Connected Characters Created To Help Parents from A to Z 
Who said sensors need to be impersonal and boring? Bleep Bleeps is a bunch of connected objects and devices that are designed to help you through out every stage of parenting. The company has given their line of IoT products a quirky twist by making each of them a character with a name and a story. Their launch product, Sammy Screamer, is currently being crowdfunded on Kickstarter.
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Sammy Screamer, is a cute little movement sensor that lets you know when something has been moved. Sammy has a magnetic backing which is great for things like fridges, laundry machines and cookie tins and a loop option which lets you tie her to a bag, a door handle or your baby’s stroller. 
All of the connected characters, including Sammy, are controlled using the Bleep Bleeps app. For Sammy, you are able to control how loud you want her to scream and how sensitive she should be to movement. When someone moves the object Sammy is watching, she will physically scream and will also send a push notification to your smartphone.

The Bleep Bleeps cast of characters also include:
Tony Tempa - an ear thermometer
Cecil G - a GPS bracelet
Ultra San - Ultrasound Pregnancy Scanner
Master Bates - Male Fertility Tester
David Camera - Video Baby Monitor
Olivia P Sticks - Ovulation Tester
Lilly Loco - GPS Device 
Bleep Bleeps’ crowdfunding campaign is doing quite well. With 10 days to go they have already tripled their goal, having raised over $66,000 to date. Backers can still grab Sammy for $65 for an August 2014 shipping date.

Connected Characters Created To Help Parents from A to Z

Who said sensors need to be impersonal and boring? Bleep Bleeps is a bunch of connected objects and devices that are designed to help you through out every stage of parenting. The company has given their line of IoT products a quirky twist by making each of them a character with a name and a story. Their launch product, Sammy Screamer, is currently being crowdfunded on Kickstarter.

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2014 CES Trends to Watch
Chief Economist and Senior Director of Research, Consumer Electronics Association, Shawn G. DuBravac, presented the four major trends he sees coming out of this year’s International CES at an event held for press yesterday.
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The first major trend was mass customization which is exemplified in the growth of the 3D printer market. With 3D printing bringing manufacturing down to a individual level, we are seeing products customized in a whole new way. 3D printer shipments are expected to reach 99 million this year, still a nascent market but definitely growing.
The second trend was the expansion of the screen. First there was TV, then the computer, then the smartphone and tablet. This year we are expected to see continued growth in the tablet space and the introduction of wearables like smartwatches emerging as a new display segment. The smartwatch market is expected to grow from 1 million this year to 1.5 million in 2014. In addition, we are expected to see growth in ultra high definition display formats both for TVs and other displays like smartphones.
The use of sensors to create an “Age of Autonomy” was DuBravac’s third trend. Sensors have become more accessible and cheaper making them easier for manufacturers to use, thus increasing the number of devices that incorporate them. Sensors that monitor and make adjustments on our behalf are expected to be widespread this year especially in home automation. DuBravac suggests that sensor use will continue to solve individual problems but eventually we will connect these solutions to create autonomous ones. For example, today we may have a sensor that helps us park or adapts cruise control on our car. Tomorrow, these sensors and others combined will provide us with the self driving car.
The final trend to come out of CES this year is curation and context. This trend is when our data gathered from sensors (wearables, the Internet of Things etc.) provides a curated experience, product or service. DuBravac used Netflix as an example where our content suggestions could become even more refined if Netflix were able to tap into much more than just our viewing habits but our eating habits, sleeping and even health patterns. 

2014 CES Trends to Watch

Chief Economist and Senior Director of Research, Consumer Electronics Association, Shawn GDuBravac, presented the four major trends he sees coming out of this year’s International CES at an event held for press yesterday.

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Sony SmartWig Patent Proves Anything Can Be A Wearable, But Why?
Here’s a head scratcher - literally. Sony has filed a patent for a SmartWig. Yep you read that right. A wearable device in the shape of fake hair. 
Sony has been a pioneer in the wearable space. Their smartwatch is already in its second generation and has been on the market since 2012. So perhaps they are getting bored for the expected and are really thinking out-of-the-box. But this is really out there (even for me).
According to the patent filing the wig is meant to cover at least part of the user’s head with at least one sensor for input, a communication interface and the necessary processors to handle these. All of these components are meant to be hidden in the wig.
The filing goes on to detail that the SmartWig would have GPS, an integrated camera and the ability to transmit and receive ultrasound waves. It would also be able to talk to a secondary computer (like a smartphone or tablet or even another wearable with a screen) and provide tactile feedback to the wearer. Oh and did I mention the laser pointer?!
My favourite feature is wig positioning sensor to help you make sure that your fake hair is on right. You have to give them credit for thinking of everything, right?
As its only a patent, this idea may never come to the market or at least may not come to the market with all the bells and whistles described above. On one hand (or head), its great to see the potential of all of this technology but on the other side, I am not too sure how many people are going to want to wear fake hair. For those that do, the patent also details that the wig will be offered using natural and/or artificial hair pieces so you might have some options.
Sources: UPTO, Engadget

Sony SmartWig Patent Proves Anything Can Be A Wearable, But Why?

Here’s a head scratcher - literally. Sony has filed a patent for a SmartWig. Yep you read that right. A wearable device in the shape of fake hair. 

Sony has been a pioneer in the wearable space. Their smartwatch is already in its second generation and has been on the market since 2012. So perhaps they are getting bored for the expected and are really thinking out-of-the-box. But this is really out there (even for me).

According to the patent filing the wig is meant to cover at least part of the user’s head with at least one sensor for input, a communication interface and the necessary processors to handle these. All of these components are meant to be hidden in the wig.

The filing goes on to detail that the SmartWig would have GPS, an integrated camera and the ability to transmit and receive ultrasound waves. It would also be able to talk to a secondary computer (like a smartphone or tablet or even another wearable with a screen) and provide tactile feedback to the wearer. Oh and did I mention the laser pointer?!

My favourite feature is wig positioning sensor to help you make sure that your fake hair is on right. You have to give them credit for thinking of everything, right?

As its only a patent, this idea may never come to the market or at least may not come to the market with all the bells and whistles described above. On one hand (or head), its great to see the potential of all of this technology but on the other side, I am not too sure how many people are going to want to wear fake hair. For those that do, the patent also details that the wig will be offered using natural and/or artificial hair pieces so you might have some options.

Sources: UPTO, Engadget

Biohacker Implants Chip Into Arm to Take on Evolution

And I thought I was into “wearable tech” but this guy takes the cake!

Tim Cannon is a biohacker (a group that merges human and machine in a DIY style) who is attempting to take on the limitations of evolution. Cannon put a chip in his arm which enables him to record and transfer his own biometrical data. 

"The human body is really really failing in almost everyday. I want to live to be thousands of years old. I don’t want to do. I don’t understand why anybody would" Tim Cannon DIY Cyborg told Motherboard.

The sensor is HUGE and looks as though Cannon has an iPod under his skin. But after a successful operation he demonstrates that data is being collected and sent over to his connected device.

Source: Motherboard

Dash Wants to Be the Fitbit for Cars

It’s not just you that can be quantified as part of the Quantified Self movement. 

Dash is an app that can talk to your car’s sensors (seems as though cars after 1996 have these built-in) and uses its algorithms to make you a better driver. It reports on things like gas, mileage and will even call 911 and your family if you get into a crash.

Source: Fast Company

Using Cosmetics to Control Gadgets

One of the most intriguing developments to come out of the recent ACM Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces Conference is new work from the Brazilian scientist, Katia Vega, who offered up something called “electro-cosmetics”, or the field of research into controlling electronics using cosmetic make-up. Using facial cues the make-up is activated, controlling different electronic devices remotely. And, it doesn’t stop there. Vega is even developing an RFID tagged set of fingernails that can be used to DJ music by moving them through a contained body of water.

Why it’s relevant:

The world of connectivity and wearable technology is changing rapidly. With this new technology, you no longer need a gadget to control a gadget. It’s all about what you wear.

Home 2025 - GE Appliance Design Ideas

GE has imagined the enhancements that will change the way we live and how our homes will look a dozen years from now. Four GE Appliances industrial designers describe their appliance vision for the year 2025. Learn more at http://www.geappliances.com/home2025

[via nextbigfuture]

Hexoskin Smart Shirt Wants to Start a Health Revolution

Almost at their funding goal on Indiegogo of $100,000 - so looks like the people want it too!

Check out more on their crowdfunding page: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/hexoskin-the-first-wearable-movement-respiration-and-heart-activity-tracker/x/304040

10 Innovations in Wearable Tech That Will Blow Your Mind
List is here: 10 innovations in wearable tech 
Awesome list by Brit + Co on wearable tech advancements which features some of the projects that are bubbling up under the bigger players like Samung, Pebble and the like. 
I highly recommend you click on over and check it out! http://britmorin.com/post/60375294967/10-innovations-in-wearable-tech-that-are-blowing
 via: brit

10 Innovations in Wearable Tech That Will Blow Your Mind

List is here: 10 innovations in wearable tech 

Awesome list by Brit + Co on wearable tech advancements which features some of the projects that are bubbling up under the bigger players like Samung, Pebble and the like. 

I highly recommend you click on over and check it out! http://britmorin.com/post/60375294967/10-innovations-in-wearable-tech-that-are-blowing

 via: brit

Wearable Tech Ain’t Just Glasses and Watches
wildcat2030:

In the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings.
Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right or left, or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.
Lynette Jones, a senior research scientist in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, designs wearable tactile displays. Through her work, she’s observed that the skin is a sensitive — though largely untapped — medium for communication.
“If you compare the skin to the retina, you have about the same number of sensory receptors, you just have them over almost two square meters of space, unlike the eye where it’s all concentrated in an extremely small area,” Jones says. “The skin is generally as useful as a very acute area. It’s just that you need to disperse the information that you’re presenting.” (via Can you feel me now? - MIT News Office)

Wearable Tech Ain’t Just Glasses and Watches

wildcat2030:

In the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings.

Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right or left, or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.

Lynette Jones, a senior research scientist in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, designs wearable tactile displays. Through her work, she’s observed that the skin is a sensitive — though largely untapped — medium for communication.

“If you compare the skin to the retina, you have about the same number of sensory receptors, you just have them over almost two square meters of space, unlike the eye where it’s all concentrated in an extremely small area,” Jones says. “The skin is generally as useful as a very acute area. It’s just that you need to disperse the information that you’re presenting.” (via Can you feel me now? - MIT News Office)

Robotic ape uses complex feet to move on all fours
To keep the arms and legs in sync and properly touching the ground, the DFKI outfitted each foot and hand with a variety of sensors. Force sensors allow the robot to detect how it’s aligned and moving, and proximity sensors allow it to properly step and make sure that it doesn’t run into anything. Temperature and acceleration sensors are built into the robot elsewhere.
 via: thisistheverge

Robotic ape uses complex feet to move on all fours

To keep the arms and legs in sync and properly touching the ground, the DFKI outfitted each foot and hand with a variety of sensors. Force sensors allow the robot to detect how it’s aligned and moving, and proximity sensors allow it to properly step and make sure that it doesn’t run into anything. Temperature and acceleration sensors are built into the robot elsewhere.

 via: thisistheverge

A Wearable Alert to Head Injuries in Sports
HARD knocks to the head are a constant concern in contact sports — and not just in football or boxing, where recent attention has focused. Millions of girls and boys play hockey, soccer, lacrosse and other sports where blows to the head from collisions and falls are part of the game, even in youth leagues and on high school teams.
Head injuries can come from a single jarring impact during a game, or from a series of smaller jolts. But in the midst of play, many blows aren’t necessarily easy to spot by coaches, physicians or parents in attendance.
A crop of new lightweight devices that athletes can wear on the field may help people on sidelines keep better track of hits to players’ heads during games and practice sessions. The devices, packed with sensors and microprocessors, register a blow to a player’s skull and immediately signal the news by blinking brightly, or by sending a wireless alert.
Athletes can wear the devices pressed tightly to their heads, held in place by a headband within a beanie, for example, or even by an adhesive patch and Velcro. (via A Wearable Alert to Head Injuries in Sports - NYTimes.com)
via: wildcat2030

A Wearable Alert to Head Injuries in Sports

HARD knocks to the head are a constant concern in contact sports — and not just in football or boxing, where recent attention has focused. Millions of girls and boys play hockey, soccer, lacrosse and other sports where blows to the head from collisions and falls are part of the game, even in youth leagues and on high school teams.

Head injuries can come from a single jarring impact during a game, or from a series of smaller jolts. But in the midst of play, many blows aren’t necessarily easy to spot by coaches, physicians or parents in attendance.

A crop of new lightweight devices that athletes can wear on the field may help people on sidelines keep better track of hits to players’ heads during games and practice sessions. The devices, packed with sensors and microprocessors, register a blow to a player’s skull and immediately signal the news by blinking brightly, or by sending a wireless alert.

Athletes can wear the devices pressed tightly to their heads, held in place by a headband within a beanie, for example, or even by an adhesive patch and Velcro. (via A Wearable Alert to Head Injuries in Sports - NYTimes.com)

via: wildcat2030

The RoboRoach:Robotics Beetle hits Kickstarter

The RoboRoach is a $99 kit consisting of electrodes, sensors, and a few batteries that allows anyone to drive their very own cockroach.
Attaching the electronic “backpack” to an unwitting arthropod is not for the squeamish. You must sand down the top of the critter’s head in order to attach a plug, “Exactly like the Matrix,” says Backyard Brains cofounder Greg Gage. Once installed, the system relays electrical impulses over a Bluetooth connection from your phone to the cockroach’s brain, via its antennae. The roach perceives each stimulus to its antennae as an obstacle, and changes direction. The same technique, applied to the cilia of the inner ear, is used in cochlear implants and during deep brain stimulation for treating a variety of disorders.
Greg Gage is an electrical engineer-turned-neuroscience student at the University of Michigan who, with his cofounder Tim Marzullo, started developing the RoboRoach three years ago. “The reason why we started is because I was annoyed that it was so late that I found out about a career in neuroscience. We have one in five people with a neurological disorder and we have no cures—we’re kind of in the dark ages. We want to get kids to understand that this is a career, and you can do so many amazing things.”

 
Kickstarter Campaign: 
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/backyardbrains/the-roboroach-control-a-living-insect-from-your-sm

The RoboRoach:Robotics Beetle hits Kickstarter

The RoboRoach is a $99 kit consisting of electrodes, sensors, and a few batteries that allows anyone to drive their very own cockroach.

Attaching the electronic “backpack” to an unwitting arthropod is not for the squeamish. You must sand down the top of the critter’s head in order to attach a plug, “Exactly like the Matrix,” says Backyard Brains cofounder Greg Gage. Once installed, the system relays electrical impulses over a Bluetooth connection from your phone to the cockroach’s brain, via its antennae. The roach perceives each stimulus to its antennae as an obstacle, and changes direction. The same technique, applied to the cilia of the inner ear, is used in cochlear implants and during deep brain stimulation for treating a variety of disorders.

Greg Gage is an electrical engineer-turned-neuroscience student at the University of Michigan who, with his cofounder Tim Marzullo, started developing the RoboRoach three years ago. “The reason why we started is because I was annoyed that it was so late that I found out about a career in neuroscience. We have one in five people with a neurological disorder and we have no cures—we’re kind of in the dark ages. We want to get kids to understand that this is a career, and you can do so many amazing things.”

Whistle - Wearable Tech For Your Dog

It was only a matter of time that we started to see wearable tech officially enter the pet market. There are 46 million American households own a dog making up a $53 billion dollar pet industry expenditures annually, according to the American Pet Products Association

Introducing Whistle - a Fitbit-like device for your puppy. Whistle uses information including weight, age, breed, and location to provide rich, individualized insights about your pet. The bluetooth wearable device is waterproof and has a 10-hour batter and attaches to your dogs collar. It can be pre-ordered now for $99.95 USD.

Here is how it works:

The sensor sends information to your smartphone for you to view and keep track of various activities for your pet using the available data. Insights include walking, playing, and resting states. The information is great for both owners and vets alike to help manage the health and fitness of your dog.

Source - Images and Video: Whistle.com