Vislab PROUD Self Driving Car Test 2013

Vislab Proud 2013 Demo 

For the first time in history, during the PROUD-Car Test 2013 event (happened on July 12, 2013 in Parma) a vehicle moved autonomously and in total safety on a mixed traffic route (rural, freeway, and urban) open to public traffic, with nobody on the driver seat." See more 

Proud to be part of this Team ! 

 

Continental and IBM sign connected-car alliance | Cnet
The automotive supplier’s technology is moving toward “highly automated driving,” with IBM servers processing real-time vehicle data so cars can anticipate detailed driving conditions.
via: smartercities

Continental and IBM sign connected-car alliance | Cnet

The automotive supplier’s technology is moving toward “highly automated driving,” with IBM servers processing real-time vehicle data so cars can anticipate detailed driving conditions.

via: smartercities

Self Driving Cars Standard in Masdar City

Masdar City uses a driverless “personal rapid transport” system delivering residents from point A to point B with no effort on the “driver’s” part.

BuzzFeed did a feature recently on Masdar City calling it the City of the Future. Among self driving cars, the city was built to be entirely off the grid and its residents are dedicated to advancing science and technology (ummm next vacation spot = yes please!). 

Its the first zero-carbon city and its in the middle of the desert. Check out more information and pictures here: http://www.buzzfeed.com/ashleyperez/the-city-of-the-future-is-here

12 Technologies That Are Improving at Insane Speeds

Business Insider published this graphic as part of an article they did summarizing the McKinsey report which featured disruptive technologies that are impacting the global economy.

McKinsey publishes “Gallery of Disruptive Technologies”

McKinsey & Company have published a comprehensive white paper and visual slideshow gallery on the 12 most advanced disruptive technologies that will change our lives. 

I have highlighted some of these technologies which are at the core of Future Tech Report.

For more information and to view the full slideshow (where the above 4 were originally taken from) of all 12 technologies visit: http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/business_technology/disruptive_technologies

Yes! Let’s Start Seriously Talking About Flying Cars

Nothing says Future like a flying car. No amount of smart watches, Google Glasses and biosensors can compete with the dream of personal flying machines. Terrafugia’s flying car concept isn’t new - but its making news again which is truly exciting.

Let’s keep this conversation going! Can’t wait to start to see these things in the air in my lifetime!

From the website:

  • TF-X™ will carry four people in car-like comfort.
  • TF-X™ will have a non-stop flight range of at least 500 miles.
  • TF-X™ will fit into a standard construction single car garage.
  • TF-X™ will be able to takeoff vertically from a level clearing of at least 100ft in diameter.
  • TF-X™ will be able to drive on roads and highways – providing true door-to-door convenience and an automotive level of weather insensitivity.
  • TF-X™ is a fixed wing street-legal aircraft with electric ground drive and electric power assist on takeoff and landing.
  • TF-X™ will be able to recharge its batteries either from its engine or by plugging in to electric car charging stations.
  • TF-X™ will be capable of “auto-landing” at approved landing sites within approved weather limits.
  • Prior to departure, the operator selects a primary target landing zone and backup landing zones.  If the TF-X™ calculates insufficient energy on board to conduct last minute aborts at the first two sites and safely navigate to and land at the third within a 30 minute reserve, or if the forecast weather in any of the three landing zones would be outside the allowable limits, or if any of the selected landing zones are in temporarily restricted airspace (TFRs), departure will not be allowed until appropriate landing zones are selected.

BTW you can reserve one now for a $10,000 deposit here.

 

Researchers testing frugal autonomous car system, aim for $150 price tag
Google certainly has pockets deep enough to trick out self-driving cars with any kind of pricey gear, but researchers at the University of Oxford have begun testing a solution that aims to keep things affordable. Currently, the system leverages an array of low-profile stereo cameras and lasers that rings up at about £5,000 (approximately $7,750), but the next goal is to knock the price down to £500, and eventually to a cool £100 (roughly $150). “Really, we do need to solve the engineering challenges of not relying on expensive sensors, but relying on cheap sensors,” Professor Paul Newman told the Telegraph. “But doing some really smart things with those cheap sensor feeds.”
Rather than a vehicle that acts as a chauffeur at all times, Newman’s vision for the modified Nissan Leaf, dubbed RobotCar, is for it to take control on select occasions. While drivers go about their commute, the system composes a 3D map of the car’s environs and commits it to memory. When the auto identifies a familiar setting and feels confident about its ability to take the reigns, it could let the driver know it’s ready to assume control. Right now, the automobile’s been tested on private roads, but the team behind it is working with the UK’s Department of Transportation to roll it onto public streets.
via smarterplanet

Researchers testing frugal autonomous car system, aim for $150 price tag

Google certainly has pockets deep enough to trick out self-driving cars with any kind of pricey gear, but researchers at the University of Oxford have begun testing a solution that aims to keep things affordable. Currently, the system leverages an array of low-profile stereo cameras and lasers that rings up at about £5,000 (approximately $7,750), but the next goal is to knock the price down to £500, and eventually to a cool £100 (roughly $150). “Really, we do need to solve the engineering challenges of not relying on expensive sensors, but relying on cheap sensors,” Professor Paul Newman told the Telegraph. “But doing some really smart things with those cheap sensor feeds.”

Rather than a vehicle that acts as a chauffeur at all times, Newman’s vision for the modified Nissan Leaf, dubbed RobotCar, is for it to take control on select occasions. While drivers go about their commute, the system composes a 3D map of the car’s environs and commits it to memory. When the auto identifies a familiar setting and feels confident about its ability to take the reigns, it could let the driver know it’s ready to assume control. Right now, the automobile’s been tested on private roads, but the team behind it is working with the UK’s Department of Transportation to roll it onto public streets.

via smarterplanet

Standards: The Jedi Force Behind the Internet of Things

By the end of this year, we will start to see people walk around with glasses that give an augmented view of reality; stare at their watches to read emails and wear headbands that control apps with a simple thought from our brain.

image

The Connected Revolution is here and 2013 is definitely shaping up to be the start of what is being coined the Internet of Things (IoT). New devices like Google Glass, Pebble, the iWatch and even the brainwave headband, Muse, are all expected to be available for purchase by the end of this year and this is all just the beginning. It is predicted that 50 to 100 billion things will be electronically connected by 2020.

While all this new technology coming to the market is exciting, one powerful ingredient is absolutely necessary for it all to work and thrive – Standards.

Standards are like an unseen force - something you never think of when it comes to functional technology but absolutely critical in making it all work. Email, HTTPS, USB and WIFI are all products of standards and of course we wouldn’t be able to live without any of these today.

I recently had the fantastic opportunity to sit down and talk with the Karen Bartleson, President of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association or the I-triple-E (IEEE-SA) on the important role standards play in this key time of our technological evolution.

Bartleson likened standards to “connective tissue” that is necessary to support and connect innovation and technology. Without standards, there would be no common platform from which providers could innovate and create upon. This would ultimately impact the widespread adoption of ideas and concepts necessary for technology to succeed on a global scale.

To build these standards, the IEEE organization often employ the use of an open paradigm they call Open Stand. This approach is essential to pace the speed of which standards are adopted with the fast pace of innovation – thus making it more market driven. The method uses the consensus of the IEEE membership requiring a majority agreement of 75% rather than the more national approach that leans on approvals from regulatory bodies such as the government. 

As interconnectivity is a the core of the Internet of Things, IEEE is holding a workshop dedicated to identifying collaboration opportunities and standardization gaps specific in China on April 12, 2012 with the hopes to help the industry foster the growth of IoT in the market.

As well, according to Bartleson, IEEE-SA is currently working on a number of standards related to the Internet of Things including:

  • Network standards
  • Sensors
  • Medical Devices
  • Smart Home / Smart Grid
  • Smart Highways
  • Self driving cars

As we start to see more and more connected things integrate into our daily lives, we will know that the necessary standards to let our fridge talk to our phone; or our car drive us to work, have been put in place to make it all work. So when you strap on your iWatch or put on your Google Glasses – take a moment to say a silent thank you to IEEE-SA for helping to make it all happen.

By Tom Emrich

Outside of diving deep into things of the future, my other favorite pastime is taking a look back at predictions made of the future from long ago. 

This 1988 look at LA in 2013 may look more futuristic in design but from the LA Times article is pretty bang on. 

Great read! Travel back and get some perspective on where we thought w e would all be nearly 20 years ago.

latimes:

The brave new world of…2013

You may not have a robot dog, techno-comforts or kids listening to “futura-rock.” But some of the predictions in this recently-rediscovered issue of the Los Angeles Times Magazine largely hold true.

Predictions about the increased prevalence of telecommunication, smarter cars (though ours don’t look as funky as the ones seen above) and globalization all seem to be rather spot-on, considering they were made in 1988!

That said, there’s no way your morning starts out like this:

With a barely perceptible click, the Morrow house turns itself on, as it has every morning since the family had it retrofitted with the Smart House system of wiring five years ago…in the study, the family’s personalized home newspaper, featuring articles on the subjects that interest them…is being printed by laser-jet printer off the home computer – all while the family sleeps.

Read through the full article here.

Photos: Los Angeles Times