Cut Copy Releases First 3D Printed Music Video
The music industry has been quick to use 3D printing to market new albums. Back in December we reported that Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke 3D printed vinyl records at a pop-up shop in London to mark the release of his LP. Indie-electronic band, Cut Copy, recently released a music video which used 3D printers to create the starring characters of their new music video “We Are Explorers”.
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The video features two miniature neon green cubist-like characters walking around the streets of LA, which happened to be life size. The video is shot in a stop-motion like manner. 
According to ToneDeaf, “To get the mini-explorers to glow, the figurines were printed in a special UV-reactive material so that when Director of Photography Sesse Lind shot them at night, under black light bulbs, they gave off the necessary fluoro effect”.
But Cut Copy isn’t just using 3D printers to create elements in their video. They are also encouraging their fans to recreate these little guys by giving them access to a BitTorrent Bundle which features the 3D printing files, footage, storyboards, stop-motion schematics and the music. The hope is that people will print the characters and be inspired to shoot their own footage as part of a fan-artist collaboration experience.

Cut Copy - We Are Explorers Music Video

Cut Copy Releases First 3D Printed Music Video

The music industry has been quick to use 3D printing to market new albums. Back in December we reported that Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke 3D printed vinyl records at a pop-up shop in London to mark the release of his LP. Indie-electronic band, Cut Copy, recently released a music video which used 3D printers to create the starring characters of their new music video “We Are Explorers”.

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The Godfather of Wearable Tech - INTERVIEW

Steve Mann, the father of AR and Wearable Tech, sits down with Alan Jones for a conversation on his smart glasses, being a Cyborg and the concept of sousveillance. 

Steve talks about how he was inspired to invent and wear a digital eyeglass called EyeTap. He also explains how this wearable device creates difficulty with authority which inspired him to look at the difference between surveillance (authorities looking over us) and sousveillance (people looking at authority from below). 

He also demoes his water-based musical instrument the Hydraulophone.

Steve Mann is also the inventor of HDR which is being used in many devices to improve picture taking quality - including the iPhone.

Minority BEAT BOX Report

fastcompany:

Watch this beat boxer go nuts with Leap Motion

“I think that people and electronic music could be more free. Normally, electronic musicians aren’t even a little bit free on live stage because they are face to face with the laptop all the time. Just move.” —Electro beat boxer Ryo Fujimoto.

True Simplicity - The New Face of iOS

Ive’s presented the new look and feel for iOS7. Its a much flatter, more modern and very different look for the iPhone than we have seen in the past.

In addition to a new look and feel, Apple announced these new features for iOS which are much welcomed including Multi-tasking, Control Center, updates to the Notification centre, a focus on AirDrop, updates to Siri and Photos.

iOS wasn’t the only change - Apple launched their much anticipated streaming radio service - iTunes Radio.

Check out more direct from Apple

What do you think about the new changes?

THE POWER OF THE MIND: Music Made By Mind Control

Watch how these three guys, despite their physical disability, are able to create a tune by just using their minds. 

(via refreshedforlife)

Supermarket terminal lets you choose your own music to shop to.
New Zealand supermarket Pak ‘N Save is installing the touch terminals at all of its 50 locations, allowing customers to que up music from the supermarkets own database to play while shopping. To avoid misuse of the system, once a song has been selected it can’t be replayed for a couple of hours.
Retailers have been accused by psychologists of pumping out high-tempo music to encourage impulse purchases.
But Jules Lloyd, brand director at Pak ‘n Save’s parent company Foodstuffs, said research showed customers were happier shopping when they were listening to their favourite music.
“And we are all about giving our customers the best experience whilst in store.”
VIA: 8bitfuture

Supermarket terminal lets you choose your own music to shop to.

New Zealand supermarket Pak ‘N Save is installing the touch terminals at all of its 50 locations, allowing customers to que up music from the supermarkets own database to play while shopping. To avoid misuse of the system, once a song has been selected it can’t be replayed for a couple of hours.

Retailers have been accused by psychologists of pumping out high-tempo music to encourage impulse purchases.

But Jules Lloyd, brand director at Pak ‘n Save’s parent company Foodstuffs, said research showed customers were happier shopping when they were listening to their favourite music.

“And we are all about giving our customers the best experience whilst in store.”

VIA: 8bitfuture

(via 8bitfuture)

Cmdr Chris Hadfield Serenades Us From Space

Hadfield - you are a Canadian Treasure and my personal hero! 

iheartchaos:

Morning music: Astronaut Chris Hadfield sings David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” while in outer space

Fantastic…

Neuroturntable demands your attention otherwise “No Music for You”

Products that use bio-inputs seem to be popping up more and more as wearable device technology advances and is becoming more of a reality.

I recently covered one such device from my time at Expand this past weekend. Muse, a headband which will be available for the general pubic later this year, uses brainwaves to analyze your state and also to control apps. 

Today I stumbled upon Neurowear - a project team based in Tokyo focused on creating “communication for the near future”. They design prototypes of products that use biological signals like brainwaves and heartbeats as input controls. 

Neurowear has tons of products on their site which use bio-inputs to make things happen. Some of the latest projects involve bunny ears and tails (perhaps not the most useful but extremely fun) but a music-based project  Neuroturntable, caught my eye.

The Neuroturntable is a revolutionary concept which reads brainwaves to play music based on the level of concentration of the user.

Here is how it works:

Step 1: Put your favorite record on the turntable.

Step 2: Put on a brainwave headset

Step 3: Concentrate on the music

The music keeps playing while you concentrate. Once you are distracted, the music slows down and automatically stops. The video shows the user getting a call while listening and when he takes it the turntable stops playing.

Talk about really hitting home the fact that we CAN’T truly multi-task.

I could definitely see applications in the educational sector for this type of technology. What better way to get your kid to focus on something then to have it disappear or stop if they aren’t really thinking about it.

I would guess that starting and stopping based on concentration is only the start of what this technology could do. Soon we will be turning on, changing the channel and doing other tasks without gesture, touch or voice.

I can’t wait.  

iPad Controlled Lego Robot Band Makes Music

The use of Arduino and Raspberry Pi has equipped anyone with the ability to create a real-life working robot. This is no exception for Joseph Acito, sound designer and producer with over 20 years in the music industry

Joseph Acito introduces this video on his blog:

"Toa Mata Band is a band of small robots Series LEGO Bionicle playing mini electronic instruments. Everything is controlled by a MIDI sequencer for the iPad, the app Clavia NordBeat whose notes are converted into electrical impulses by an Arduino Uno."

The use of Arduino to make anyone a robot genius was one of the key messages from a talk Chris Anderson, former Editor-in-Chief turned robot thought leader, focused on at Expand this weekend. Anderson’s new venture 3D Robotics and DIY Drone use Arduino to create aerial drones fully equipped with cameras. We covered a demo of one of his robots here

Can’t Make SXSW This Year? Live Vicariously Through These Folks

SXSW has begun! 

image

Can’t make it to Austin, Texas this year? I’ve listed the Tweeters, Viners and even a Spotify playlist to help you create the next best thing while sitting in your office or on the couch at home. It may not make up for all the parties, cool products and celebrities you are missing out on but hey, you’ll look pretty smart at the water cooler at work this week. 

Of course, if you don’t take these suggestions, just hit any social network with the official hashtag #SXSW.

Or you can take the work out of it using Storify: http://storify.com/search?q=sxsw or LiveFyre http://sx.livefyre.com dashboards. 

Twitter (via Digital Trends)

  • @LeapMotion
  • @Memototeam
  • @Lytro
  • @GoogleSXSW
  • @LanyrdSXSW
  • @SWSXTweet
  • @Lyft
  • @PopMontreal
  • @Pitchforkmedia
  • @BVSXSW
  • @SpinnerSXSW
  • @360SXSW
  • @ChronSXSW
  • @SXSW
  • @SXSwpartyzzzzz
  • @WiredSXSW
  • @SXSWparty
  • @SpinSXSW
  • @IFCSXSW

Vine (via Mashable)

  • Justin Bolognino
  • Omar Gallaga
  • Digital Gypsy
  • Luis Gutierrez
  • Amit Jotwani
  • Austinist Film
  • Sam Decker
  • Mike Bianchini
  • SXSW
  • SXSWSoul
  • Mashable

Spotify SXSW Playlist 2013: http://open.spotify.com/user/avermat/playlist/75wsYv0KRX6GNIx6d1xfle

AR or augmented reality is not a new thing. QR codes and similar have been trying to push their way to the masses via print for a while now. This Headphone Music Festival campaign in Tokyo Japan is a great example of  how a whole other layer of reality can be seen through a connected device. 

Users download an app and then use it to view virtual concerts of their favorite artists when they hold their mobile phones over a set of headphones (the visual cue or QR code here). This Augmented Reality Music Festival looks like it was awesome to engage with but even better to witness as someone who is just passing by (i.e. a marketer’s dream).

I have to say that I feel as though my arm would get tired watching a whole set of a virtual concert through my phone (but one could argue you do this anyways when filming with an iPhone in real life) - but what this video does for me is further solidify how exciting something like Google Glasses is in bringing a whole new dimension to content and engagement with media that we are not currently used to.

Check out the video and shoot me some notes on your reaction.

via digitalsculpture: Augmented Reality Music Festival