Ring Wants To Be The One Wearable To Rule Them All
Turning your lights on with the flick of a finger may be something you would expect to read in a Harry Potter novel rather than see on a page in Kickstarter, but a new wearable, Ring, is making it happen. 
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Ring uses ultra-small finger gesture recognition technology to control your smart home, smartphone or any connected thing. Tapping on the ring activates the device to start to identify the gesture you draw with your finger. Gestures are predefined or can be edited or created using the Ring smartphone app. 
Imagine controlling your Phillips Hue lights simply by drawing a lightbulb or changing the song playing on your smartphone by gesturing a music note. Ring’s gesture recognition is so precise that it can even identify letters which means drawing text in mid-air can be used to write a message.
Although the predominant body part for wearables today is still the wrist, we have seen a number of finger-based solutions enter the market. Last week, we saw Fin wrap up its Indiegogo campaign for a wearable ring that turns your palm into a numeric keyboard and gesture interface. And back in August, the NFC ring successfully funded on Kickstarter.
It looks as though Ring has resonated more with users, perhaps due to the simplistic design and its robust feature set it. Ring has already raised over $665,000 on Kickstarter, on course to triple the $250,000 funding goal it has set for the campaign which ends on April 4. 

Ring Wants To Be The One Wearable To Rule Them All

Turning your lights on with the flick of a finger may be something you would expect to read in a Harry Potter novel rather than see on a page in Kickstarter, but a new wearable, Ring, is making it happen. 

Read More

Turn Your Palm Into a Controller with Smart Ring Fin
Ever since Tom Cruise used his hands to swipe through a computer interface in the popular Sci-Fi movie “Minority Report”, we have been obsessed with making this movie magic come alive. The dream of just using your hand to control any connected thing has inspired many devices including the much anticipated Myo from Thalmic Labs. 
A new Indiegogo project is raising money for a smart ring called Fin with similar ambitions.
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Fin is a Bluetooth-enabled ring you wear on your thumb that turns the palm of your hand into a gesture interface. The sensor-based device recognizes each segment of your fingers and then converts your palm into a numeric keypad. It can also understand swiping gestures (left, right, up and down) and let you create your own custom interactions.
RHL Vision Technologies, the team behind Fin, illustrates a myriad of use cases in their campaign video. Fin can be used to change music on your smartphone, take calls or control settings in your connected car and even be used to control the interface of a heads-up display like Google Glass.
Fin does have its limitations. It can only connect to three different devices at once. This will be a growing issue for this device as our world becomes lit up with the Internet of Things. But for now connecting it to your smartphone, smart TV and your connected car may be enough to prove its value. 
The creators behind Fin wanted to make this device as much a fashion statement as it is a functional gadget. The dovetail-designed ring will come in a five colours including Vermilion Orange, Royal White, Matte Black, Liberty Blue and Persian Green. 

I appreciate RHL’s attention to design but the device reminds me a little of a Bluetooth earpiece in that its extremely noticeable on your thumb just as the earpiece is on your head. For people who don’t want to broadcast they are wearing wearable tech, the size and placement of the ring on your hand may be an issue. 
Right now the campaign has 38 days to go and a long way to meet its $100,000 campaign goal. So the jury is out if this device will even make it to production in this manner. But if Fin’s recent win as one of the Top 15 startups at TechCrunch’s Hardware Battlefield last week is any indication of where the company is headed, then this campaign may quickly turn around.
Smart rings have historically done quite well on Indiegogo. Smarty Ring, an LED ring for notifications, raised over $290,000 of their original $40,000 goal in December of last year. So this precedent may also bode well for Fin. 
Indiegogo backers can get Fin for as low as $79 for a dev kit or $99 for their first run of the device. The ring will retail for $129 post-crowdfunding campaign. 

Turn Your Palm Into a Controller with Smart Ring Fin

Ever since Tom Cruise used his hands to swipe through a computer interface in the popular Sci-Fi movie “Minority Report”, we have been obsessed with making this movie magic come alive. The dream of just using your hand to control any connected thing has inspired many devices including the much anticipated Myo from Thalmic Labs. 

A new Indiegogo project is raising money for a smart ring called Fin with similar ambitions.

Read More

3D Printer Finger Painting with Leap Motion (by HotPopFactory)

I saw this demo at Maker Faire Toronto and it was pretty incredible. I love the use of gesture motion input device, Leap Motion, as a 3D printing modelling tool. 

And kids get it!

(via seattle-gadgets-deactivated2013)

Elon Musk is the Iron Man of Our Times
via: thisistheverge:

Elon Musk will reveal gesture-based rocket design program inspired by Iron Man
SpaceX and Tesla Motors founder Elon Musk has often been compared to a real life version of Tony Stark, aka Iron Man. Director Jon Favreau has even openly said that Musk inspired his depiction of Stark in the first Iron Man film. But now it seems as though the imitation has come full circle: Musk tweeted last night that he’d “figured out how to design rocket parts just w[ith] hand movements,” and would post a video of the process “next week.” Favreau tweeted at Musk asking: “Like in Iron Man?” And Musk responded in the affirmative. 

Elon Musk is the Iron Man of Our Times

via: thisistheverge:

Elon Musk will reveal gesture-based rocket design program inspired by Iron Man

SpaceX and Tesla Motors founder Elon Musk has often been compared to a real life version of Tony Stark, aka Iron Man. Director Jon Favreau has even openly said that Musk inspired his depiction of Stark in the first Iron Man film. But now it seems as though the imitation has come full circle: Musk tweeted last night that he’d “figured out how to design rocket parts just w[ith] hand movements,” and would post a video of the process “next week.” Favreau tweeted at Musk asking: “Like in Iron Man?” And Musk responded in the affirmative. 

Minority BEAT BOX Report

fastcompany:

Watch this beat boxer go nuts with Leap Motion

“I think that people and electronic music could be more free. Normally, electronic musicians aren’t even a little bit free on live stage because they are face to face with the laptop all the time. Just move.” —Electro beat boxer Ryo Fujimoto.

Leap Motion without the Leap?

From eyesight:

“eyeSight is a leading provider of gesture recognition technologies, powering mass market, embedded touch-free solutions that create new and exciting user experiences.

With eyeSight’s technology, users enjoy a natural user interface, allowing them to easily and intuitively control a variety of devices using simple hand gestures. Devices such as mobile phones, tablets, PCs, TVs, set-top-boxes, in-car infotainment systems, and more can now be easily controlled using natural hand gestures.”

justthelatest:

eyeSight software uses standard cameras to power 3D gesture controls

Forget Kinect! WiSee Wants To Bring Gesture Recognition to Your Whole Home

WiSee Whole-Home Gesture System lets you use Gesture Recognition where ever you are in the home - on the couch, in the kitchen etc.

The system uses available wireless signals already in your home including your router, smartphone and laptop. The signals reflect off the human body which sends signals back to these devices. Their unique algorithm makes senses of this signal to translate it into a gesture. 

This system reminds me of the Myo only from the perspective that you are able to use gestures anywhere you are in order to control connected things. But I love that the founders are taking it one step further to remove the wearable device completely.

Removing wearable devices from the gesture picture is definitely the way of the future.

From futurist-foresight:

This wifi / gesture controlled interface may just be the future of the smart home.

From futurescope:

Wi-Fi Signals Enable Gesture Recognition Throughout Entire Home

University of Washington computer scientists have developed gesture-recognition technology that brings this a step closer to reality. Researchers have shown it’s possible to leverage Wi-Fi signals around us to detect specific movements without needing sensors on the human body or cameras.

[read more] [Project]

(via futurist-foresight)

Virtual Bridge Lets People From Amsterdam Play with Venice

Created By DropStuff, a virtual “bridge” connecting Amsterdam and Venice will be active from May 27 to June 8. 

According to DropStuff: “The bridge is formed by a live connection between two large public screens that will be connected live through internet, and by using a special device; the Kinect. Between May 27 and June 10, at the two sites, visitors can see and meet each other, and play a game together on the spot.”

The video above is a demonstration of the virtual bridge in action on the Venice side. 

More information can be found on www.dropstuff.nl

I love when we see technology and art meet in this manner

Leap Motion with Windows

With Leap Motion technology and Windows, you can do everything that’s possible with multi-touch inputs — without actually touching anything.

Looking forward to get my hands above(?) this. It certainly looks awesome. The Leap Motion Controller costs $ 79.99 and the company will start shipping on July 22nd. A Mac OS X demo video is on its way as well.

via: digithoughts:

Wearables, Gesture Control & 3D Printing Make BI’s List of Tech Reinventing Our Society

Business Insider just posted a fantastic article on the “15 Ways Tech is Reinventing Society" covering most, if not all, of the hot future tech topics making headlines today (see a snapshot of their list below).

As you know my blog, Future Tech Report, is dedicated to exploring how emerging and disruptive technology is impacting our daily lives and so this article is very dear to my heart (Great job BI!).

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On the BI list of 15 included:

  • Autonomous Vehicles
  • Wearable Tech - Google Glass
  • Wearable Tech - Health & Fitness 
  • The Sharing Economy
  • Robots
  • Smartphones & Connected Devices
  • Social Networking
  • 3D Printing
  • Nano-filtration
  • Gesture-controlled devices
  • Outside use of touchscreens and wifi

If you want a quick snapshot of the future tech which is just about to change your life head on over to Business Insider.

I can’t say it enough how grateful I am to be born in this time. We truly are on the brink of a connected revolution where we will start to see changes in society we haven’t seen since the last great industrial revolution (which was before me). 

What tech are you most excited to see impact the new world, Future Geeks?

Behind the Scenes at Thalmic Labs - Creator of the Wearable Gesture Control Device “Myo”

The Myo is one of the most anticipated gesture control wearable devices expected to be released to early adopters later this year (my order is already in!).

Based in my hometown of Waterloo, Canada - this video gives a great behind the scenes look at the team, the Thalmic Labs office and some great shots of Myo in action and also provides some more information on the product and their development process which hasn’t been previously released before.

Myo uses the electrical activity from your muscles as your move your hand to detect what you are doing with your fingers as well as the motion of your hand. These gestures control connected devices via bluetooth.

The Myo stretchable cuff has been designed to be one-size fits all (they even considered making sure that arm hair doesn’t get in the way). 

The team has confirmed that their developer program in the next few months giving out exclusive access to early versions of the software of the devices.

Thalmic Labs believes that the Myo device could revolutionalize the way we interact with technology - and I agree.

Look Ma - No Hardware! Software Turns Dumb Paper into a Smart Touchscreen

Fujitsu has created a spatially aware Fingerlink Interaction System creates an interactive touchscreen like system using objects in the real world - both flat surfaces like paper and tables but also curved surfaces like books.

In this way - the system takes “dumb” items and makes them “smart”

The system doesn’t use any special hardware, it re-uses an ordinary webcam and a commercial projector. It relies on image processing technology to work its magic. 

The video demo shows how you can import information on the paper by selecting areas on the page to import as data. 

The system is designed to operate on specific gestures and will not react when you make ordinary motions on the table. The system uses finger height accurately in order to translate touch. The system can also be operated by gesture controls.

Gesture and spatial input for PC and other connected devices have received a lot of press lately with the likes of Thalmic Labs, Leap Motion and the updates from Microsoft for Kinect - but this is the first that I have seen of a company that is attempting to use this type of technology to merge the real world with the digital world outside of a typical screen.

More from Fujitsu’s press release here: http://www.fujitsu.com/global/news/pr/archives/month/2013/20130403-01.html

The total touchless sensing and gesture recognition market is expected to reach $15.02 billion by 2018 growing at a compound annual growth rate of 34.94% from 2013 to 2018.

Woven: First Complete e-Wearable Platform

Watches and glasses aren’t the only wearable items we may be using in the near future. Our clothing itself could be connected with the ability to play games, turn on our TV, track our health and more. 

Woven is the first complete e-wearable pervasive game platform prototype.

Woven is a graduate project of two Master students at the School of the Arts Utrecht (HKU) in the Netherlands: Patrick Kersten, an Interaction Designer, and Christiaan Ribbens, a Game Designer.

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The project, which ends in August, will result in an e-wearable platform with one pervasive game (games that involve the physical world not just digital0 and other smaller prototypes (games and sports apps). 

Spooky, the pervasive game in development, lets the player experience the hidden dark and funny world of ghosts, spirits and phantoms.

Video: SPOOKY - Pervasive Game for Woven, a complete e-wearable platform from Christiaan Ribbens on Vimeo.

Video: Woven - E-wearable (Game) Platform from Christiaan Ribbens on Vimeo.

Images and Video from Wearable Games