Robot Demos New Additive Manufacturing Method To Create 3D Objects on Any Surface/Incline

This reminds me of the Kickstarter project 3Doodler - the 3D Printing Pen but larger and much more powerful and with greater potential to revolutionalize the way that structures are built. 

It helps that the demo video also got a robot to show off the new material! Go Future!

irikosan:

Mataerial Introduction

A brand new method of additive manufacturing. This patent-pending method allows for creating 3D objects on any given working surface independently of its inclination and smoothness, and without a need of additional support structures. Conventional methods of additive manufacturing have been affected both by gravity and printing environment: creation of 3D objects on irregular, or non-horizontal surfaces has so far been treated as impossible . By using innovative extrusion technology we are now able to neutralize the effect of gravity during the course of the printing process. This method gives us a flexibility to create truly natural objects by making 3D curves instead of 2D layers. Unlike 2D layers that are ignorant to the structure of the object, the 3D curves can follow exact stress lines of a custom shape. Finally, our new out of the box printing method can help manufacture structures of almost any size and shape.

Gizmodo Shows Off the Robotic Bartender at Google I/O This year

Incredible video of the robotic bartender in action. Something tells me that we will be seeing these more and more in the wild - especially at tech conferences.

Pretty cool.

robo-lution:

robotic bartender at google i/o

3D Scanner: The Photon by Matterform
via emergentfutures:
The Photon by Matterform - The world’s first, truly affordable 3D scanner for anyone!
If you’ve ever wanted a 3D scanner now’s your chance. By pledging support to this project, you can have your very own Photon 3D Scanner. All the Early backers packs are sold out but just Pledge $399 to grab a batch #1.
The Photon allows anyone to take a physical object, and turn it into a digital 3D model on your computer. From there, you can print your file on any 3D printer, or online printing service. Or use the model you created in an animation or video game.
Full Story: Indiegogo
There are a lot of 3D Printers out there, but few 3D Scanners. Matterform wants to change that. Hardware details from IndieGoGo:
The Photon allows anyone to take a physical object, and turn it into a digital 3D model on your computer. From there, you can print your file on any 3D printer, or online printing service. Or use the model you created in an animation or video game.
We’ve been developing the Photon hardware and software from scratch for the past year and now we’re ready to release it to you. We’ll fulfill all the indiegogo pledges first so if you’re excited to get one, supporting us now is the best route and you can take advantage of our special intro pricing.
Video:


via: futurescope

3D Scanner: The Photon by Matterform

via emergentfutures:

The Photon by Matterform - The world’s first, truly affordable 3D scanner for anyone!

If you’ve ever wanted a 3D scanner now’s your chance. By pledging support to this project, you can have your very own Photon 3D Scanner. All the Early backers packs are sold out but just Pledge $399 to grab a batch #1.

The Photon allows anyone to take a physical object, and turn it into a digital 3D model on your computer. From there, you can print your file on any 3D printer, or online printing service. Or use the model you created in an animation or video game.

Full Story: Indiegogo

There are a lot of 3D Printers out there, but few 3D Scanners. Matterform wants to change that. Hardware details from IndieGoGo:

The Photon allows anyone to take a physical object, and turn it into a digital 3D model on your computer. From there, you can print your file on any 3D printer, or online printing service. Or use the model you created in an animation or video game.

We’ve been developing the Photon hardware and software from scratch for the past year and now we’re ready to release it to you. We’ll fulfill all the indiegogo pledges first so if you’re excited to get one, supporting us now is the best route and you can take advantage of our special intro pricing.

Video:

via: futurescope

(via futurescope)

Personal Robot is taught to satisfy one of the most critical requests from the modern day man = “grab me a beer”

Willow Garage was one of the companies featured at Engadget Expand this past weekend. Willow Garage develops hardware and open source software for robots (the open source part is key here).

Their vision is “We see personal robots as the next paradigm-shifting personal productivity tool.  By investing in open source and open platform adoption models, we aim to lay the groundwork for the use of personal robotics applications in everyday life.”

This video shows the Personal Robot 2 (PR2) fetching and delivering a beer. It uses its cameras to detect the fridge then opens the fridge. It also scans the fridge to make sure it selects the one that you requested. The same camera is used to scan for faces and once it recognizes your face it will let go of the beer and give it to you. 

From my time at Expand my eyes were opened to a whole new world of technological advancements particular to robots. I will definitely be keeping my eye on this sector as I suspect that we will start to see the resurgence of robots in our conversations around medicine, military and home use in the very near future. 

BTW - fun fact: The CEO of Willow Garage, Steve Cousins, explained that the reason why they made robots with small heads is to make them less intimidating to humans (e.g. size of head = size of brain)

Outside of diving deep into things of the future, my other favorite pastime is taking a look back at predictions made of the future from long ago. 

This 1988 look at LA in 2013 may look more futuristic in design but from the LA Times article is pretty bang on. 

Great read! Travel back and get some perspective on where we thought w e would all be nearly 20 years ago.

latimes:

The brave new world of…2013

You may not have a robot dog, techno-comforts or kids listening to “futura-rock.” But some of the predictions in this recently-rediscovered issue of the Los Angeles Times Magazine largely hold true.

Predictions about the increased prevalence of telecommunication, smarter cars (though ours don’t look as funky as the ones seen above) and globalization all seem to be rather spot-on, considering they were made in 1988!

That said, there’s no way your morning starts out like this:

With a barely perceptible click, the Morrow house turns itself on, as it has every morning since the family had it retrofitted with the Smart House system of wiring five years ago…in the study, the family’s personalized home newspaper, featuring articles on the subjects that interest them…is being printed by laser-jet printer off the home computer – all while the family sleeps.

Read through the full article here.

Photos: Los Angeles Times

This video on how technology is consuming the industrial revolution and evolving it into the connection revolution is 100% why I am so committed to telling stories about emerging technology. 

I’ve commented in the past that we are just taking our true first steps in completely redefining how we interact with the world and chose to live our lives based on the freedom technology is starting to afford us.

The everyday mundane will soon be handled by machines and robots which will afford us the ability to do what we feel we were “meant to be” in order to voluntarily contribute to society. 

The video features Seth Godin who recently published a book via Kickstarter called  ”The Icarus Deception”. In a recent interview with TNW Seth said:

“…I called it the Icarus Deception, [because] people think the story says don’t fly too close to the sun,” he says. “But that’s not what it used to say. 150 years ago, it used to say ‘don’t fly too low’. Because if you fly too low, the mist and the water will weigh you down, and you will perish. It’s about not settling – for 100 years we lived in an industrial economy, where people who ran the factories, made shoes and cars and life insurance policies, and amusement parks, they wanted us to fit in,” he says. They wanted us to be compliant, they wanted us to do what we were told, and that’s why they invented school. To teach us to sit still, and listen and regurgitate. But that industrial age is dying, right before our eyes.”

via sticepicks:

sirexdotca:

Erik Schlangen: A “self-healing” asphalt

Paved roads are nice to look at, but they’re easily damaged and costly to repair. Erik Schlangen demos a new type of porous asphalt made of simple materials with an astonishing feature: When cracked, it can be “healed” by induction heating. (Filmed at TEDxDelft.)

Erik Schlangen is a civil engineer and pioneer of experimental micromechanics, who focuses on making industrial materials more durable

In years to come, people may live lighter yet, suggests Gerd Leonhard, CEO of the Futures Agency. These personal devices, with all their cloud-based functionality, will have moved into our minds. If we require energy on the move, our clothes will harvest it through integrated photovoltaic or piezoelectric generators… We’re witnessing the rise of the modern nomad, “defined not by what they carry but by what they leave behind.” That’s the definition The Economist proposed nearly five years ago, in a feature written in anticipation of a wireless world, called Nomads at Last.

Speaking of Astronauts! This article combines the crazy coolness of space with my personal fascination with 3-D printing. 

The fact that we are now starting to dabble in machines that can create physical items - including living cells (food) is pretty incredible. 

3-D printing is in my opinion, one of the most important advancements in technology today!

quantumaniac:

3-D Printers Could Make Food for Astronauts

Several decades from now, an astronaut in a Mars colony might feel a bit hungry. Rather than reach for a vacuum-sealed food packet or cook up some simple greenhouse vegetables in a tiny kitchen, the astronaut would visit a microwave-sized box, punch a few settings, and receive a delicious and nutritious meal tailored to his or her exact tastes.

This is the promise of the rapidly maturing field of 3-D food printing, an offshoot of the revolution that uses machines to build bespoke items out of metal, plastic, and even living cells. Sooner than you think, 3-D printed designer meals may be coming to a rocketship, or a restaurant, near you.

“Right now, astronauts on the space station are eating the same seven days of food on rotations of two or three weeks,” said astronautical engineer Michelle Terfansky, who studied the potential and challenges of making 3-D printed food in space for a master’s thesis at the University of Southern California.

With 3-D printers coming of age, engineers are starting to expand the possible list of materials they might work with. The Fab@Home team at Cornell University has developed gel-like substances called hydrocolloids that can be extruded and built up into different shapes. By mixing in flavoring agents, they can produce a range of tastes and textures.

A 3-D printer could mix vitamins and amino acids into a meal to provide nutrients and boost productivity. There are limitations to the types of fresh foods that can be grown in space – NASA says some of the best crops for a Mars mission are lettuce, carrots, and tomatoes. With that you could make a salad, but a 3-D printer could manufacture croutons or protein-dense supplements. The device could take up less space than a supply of packets of food and, because each item is custom built, would help cut down on waste.

But 3-D food printing systems still have a long way to go, with most of the current limitations involving the printer’s extruding system. Some items, like frosting or processed cheese, are easy to make printable. A chocolate treat, for instance, is created using a syringe filled with melted chocolate to build up a shape specified by a computer layer by layer. But other materials – fruits, vegetables, and meats – are much more of a challenge. 

In the earliest tests of the hydrocolloid 3-D food printer, the Cornell team produced different fake items — bananas, mushrooms, mozzarella – all with the appropriate texture and flavor. Because no one wants to eat something that looks and tastes bad, Terfansky said the best thing would be to focus on making sure things are delicious and then improving the visual aesthetics.

Within five to 10 years, she said the technology might get to the point where a single printer could produce lots of different food items that are both flavorful and look like what they’re supposed to be. Terfansky sees a day further in the future when most home kitchens include a 3-D printer simple enough for a child to go up and press the “hamburger” button in order to receive a meal. Such plans may seem like the food machine from The Jetsons but other researchers say they’re not out of the realm of possibility.

Source: Wired Science

(via fastcompany)

singularsociety:

A headset that reads your brainwaves

Tan Le’s astonishing new computer interface reads its user’s brainwaves, making it possible to control virtual objects, and even physical electronics, with mere thoughts (and a little concentration). She demos the headset, and talks about its far-reaching applications

bitesbitesbites:

Cubify The Cube 3D Printer
Cubify has released “The Cube” to the general public. Though not as glamorous as the aforementioned, The Cube is still a revolutionary product in that its a commercially accessible 3-dimensional printer. For those who think on one plane inside the proverbial box, 3D printing means rendering three-dimensional objects from a 2D design.
http://bit.ly/Xk6dU5