Biohacker Implants Chip Into Arm to Take on Evolution

And I thought I was into “wearable tech” but this guy takes the cake!

Tim Cannon is a biohacker (a group that merges human and machine in a DIY style) who is attempting to take on the limitations of evolution. Cannon put a chip in his arm which enables him to record and transfer his own biometrical data. 

"The human body is really really failing in almost everyday. I want to live to be thousands of years old. I don’t want to do. I don’t understand why anybody would" Tim Cannon DIY Cyborg told Motherboard.

The sensor is HUGE and looks as though Cannon has an iPod under his skin. But after a successful operation he demonstrates that data is being collected and sent over to his connected device.

Source: Motherboard

Defibrillator Equipped Drones Speed Treatment To Those In Need - PSFK
When someone is having a cardiac arrhythmia, getting an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to that person as quickly as possible can often be the difference between life and death. The problem is that AEDs are usually only readily available in high pedestrian traffic areas such as airports or sports stadiums, due to the cost of each device. In less populated areas, it can sometimes take hours for the necessary equipment to arrive. Imagine if there was a quick and easy way to get the lifesaving tools to someone in need, faster than any ambulance or EMT.
The Defikopter is a drone that can deliver a defibrillator to heart attack victims much quicker than emergency responders. Conceived by Germany-based nonprofit Definetz, the system can carry an AED to any location based on its GPS coordinates. Although the system is still in the early stages of development, the team are developing a smartphone app that those with heart problems, or their family, can download and have on hand in case of emergency.
via: smarterplanet

Defibrillator Equipped Drones Speed Treatment To Those In Need - PSFK

When someone is having a cardiac arrhythmia, getting an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to that person as quickly as possible can often be the difference between life and death. The problem is that AEDs are usually only readily available in high pedestrian traffic areas such as airports or sports stadiums, due to the cost of each device. In less populated areas, it can sometimes take hours for the necessary equipment to arrive. Imagine if there was a quick and easy way to get the lifesaving tools to someone in need, faster than any ambulance or EMT.

The Defikopter is a drone that can deliver a defibrillator to heart attack victims much quicker than emergency responders. Conceived by Germany-based nonprofit Definetz, the system can carry an AED to any location based on its GPS coordinates. Although the system is still in the early stages of development, the team are developing a smartphone app that those with heart problems, or their family, can download and have on hand in case of emergency.

via: smarterplanet

LUMO Wearable Tech Wants You to Sit Up Straight

How many times did you hear “sit up straight” from your Mom when you grew up? Well LUMO wants to be your virtual mom by tracking your posture and “shocking you” into a better position. 

LUMO is a band with sensors that monitors and tracks your posture. You wear the band around your waist and it connects to your smartphone using Bluetooth (like most wearables today).

Here is what LUMO says needs to happen to make their product work:

"1. Activate LUMOback’s Posture Monitoring App: Download the LUMOback app from the Apple App Store and follow the instructions in the app. The app will take you through a short series of movements to do the initial calibration (e.g. walking, sitting, slouching, etc.).  In less than 5 minutes, you’ll be on the path to good posture!

2. Wear: LUMOback is a small, flexible sensor that attaches to a thin and flexible belt. Strap the belt around your lower back, either against your skin or over a thin layer or clothing.

3. Track: LUMOback’s sensors measure pelvic tilt and help guide your body position to a neutral pelvis alignment. If you slouch with your lower back, lean forward, lean backwards, or shift your weight to one side, the LUMOback will let you know via a gentle vibration so you can learn to correct your stance to good posture. LUMOback also offers tracking  to help you understand your posture now, your daily activity levels, your sleep habits, and your improvements over time.”

I have a constant war with my posture being at my computer for 10 hours a day and then straight from there to a mobile device so I can totally see value in tracking and reminding myself of my posture digitally. 

The health and fitness sector is booming with wearables and so its great to see orthopedic type applications come out to the market.

You can buy the device now for $149.00USD.

Check out the video for more features and a demo.

5 Body Parts Scientists Can 3-D Print
Ears
Team: Cornell University
How it’s made: Bioengineers take a 3-D scan of a child’s ear, design a seven-part mold in the SolidWorks CAD program, and print the pieces. The mold is injected with a high-density gel made from 250 million bovine cartilage cells and collagen from rat tails (the latter serves as a scaffold). After 15 minutes, the ear is removed and incubated in cell culture for several days. In three months, the cartilage will have propagated enough to replace the collagen.
Benefit: At least one child in 12,500 is born with microtia, a condition characterized by hearing loss due to an underdeveloped or malformed outer ear. Unlike synthetic implants, ears grown from human cells are more likely to be successfully incorporated into the body.
See Slideshow
via: thenewenlightenmentage:

5 Body Parts Scientists Can 3-D Print

Ears

Team: Cornell University

How it’s made: Bioengineers take a 3-D scan of a child’s ear, design a seven-part mold in the SolidWorks CAD program, and print the pieces. The mold is injected with a high-density gel made from 250 million bovine cartilage cells and collagen from rat tails (the latter serves as a scaffold). After 15 minutes, the ear is removed and incubated in cell culture for several days. In three months, the cartilage will have propagated enough to replace the collagen.

Benefit: At least one child in 12,500 is born with microtia, a condition characterized by hearing loss due to an underdeveloped or malformed outer ear. Unlike synthetic implants, ears grown from human cells are more likely to be successfully incorporated into the body.

See Slideshow

via: thenewenlightenmentage:

Handheld sensor detects stress and teaches users to control it
Gamification is known to be effective in encouraging positive habits when it comes to health, as devices such as the T-Haler have demonstrated. Having recently reached its funding target on Kickstarter, the PIP is a device that senses stress when held in the hand and can be used to control video game characters that teach users how to manage their anxiety. READ MORE…
via: springwise

Handheld sensor detects stress and teaches users to control it

Gamification is known to be effective in encouraging positive habits when it comes to health, as devices such as the T-Haler have demonstrated. Having recently reached its funding target on Kickstarter, the PIP is a device that senses stress when held in the hand and can be used to control video game characters that teach users how to manage their anxiety. READ MORE…

via: springwise

Personal tracking devices dominate digital health crowdfunding dollars (so far) in 2013
Including:
Scanadu’s medical scanner, Scout, $1.2 million on indiegogo
Misfit Wearables’ activity tracker, Shine, $847K on indiegogo
amiigo’s fitness bracelet, $581K on indiegogo
Radiate’s smart workout shirt, $580K on Kickstarter
Hapilabs’ smart fork, HAPIfork, $135K on Kickstarter
Full Story: MedCity
via emergentfutures:

Personal tracking devices dominate digital health crowdfunding dollars (so far) in 2013

Including:

Full Story: MedCity

via emergentfutures:

Contact lenses could zoom, thanks to leftover 3DTV technology
A DARPA-funded project has built contact lenses that can zoom in and out in to aid those with degrading eyesight. A group of researchers — from the UC San Diego and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) — said in a report that it has built a 2.8x zoom contact lens that could eventually fit on human eyes. 
thisistheverge:

Contact lenses could zoom, thanks to leftover 3DTV technology

A DARPA-funded project has built contact lenses that can zoom in and out in to aid those with degrading eyesight. A group of researchers — from the UC San Diego and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) — said in a report that it has built a 2.8x zoom contact lens that could eventually fit on human eyes. 

thisistheverge:

First “Bionic Eye” For the Blind To Be Available Later This Year
From Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence:
"The Argus II is the first and only “bionic eye” to be approved in countries throughout the world, including the U.S. It is used to treat patients with late stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Argus II was developed by Second Sight Medical Products, Inc.
Argus II works by converting video images captured by a miniature camera, housed in the patient’s glasses, into a series of small electrical pulses that are transmitted wirelessly to an array of electrodes on the surface of the retina.
These pulses are intended to stimulate the retina’s remaining cells resulting in the corresponding perception of patterns of light in the brain. Patients then learn to interpret these visual patterns thereby regaining some visual function.”
Source

First “Bionic Eye” For the Blind To Be Available Later This Year

From Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence:

"The Argus II is the first and only “bionic eye” to be approved in countries throughout the world, including the U.S. It is used to treat patients with late stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Argus II was developed by Second Sight Medical Products, Inc.

Argus II works by converting video images captured by a miniature camera, housed in the patient’s glasses, into a series of small electrical pulses that are transmitted wirelessly to an array of electrodes on the surface of the retina.

These pulses are intended to stimulate the retina’s remaining cells resulting in the corresponding perception of patterns of light in the brain. Patients then learn to interpret these visual patterns thereby regaining some visual function.”

Source

Baby’s First Picture - a 3D Hologram in the Womb?

It may be slightly disturbing, but a Japanese company can now print a 3D hologram of your unborn foetus. Oliver Wainwright explains.
Photograph: Pioneer

guardian:

Baby’s First Picture - a 3D Hologram in the Womb?

It may be slightly disturbing, but a Japanese company can now print a 3D hologram of your unborn foetus. Oliver Wainwright explains.

Photograph: Pioneer

guardian:

By 2018, ABI estimates, close to 5 million disposable sensors will be shipped even though MBAN sensors will have still barely penetrated the addressable market.

MBAN sensors will enable patient monitoring information such as temperature to be collected automatically from a wearable thermometer sensor.

Nanoscale Pressure Sensors Mimic Human Skin


New research shows how arrays of tiny electronic devices can achieve human-skin-like sensitivity to mechanical force.
Why it matters: Better tactile sensing could lead to more adaptive robots and prosthetics.
“The inventor of the technology, Zhong Lin Wang, a professor of materials science and engineering at Georgia Tech, says it has immediate applications in human-machine interfaces. For example, it could be used to capture electronic signatures by recording the distinctive force an individual applies while signing. Down the road, says Wang, his group’s pressure sensor arrays could equip robotics and prosthetics with a human-like sense of touch.”

More information: http://www.technologyreview.com/news/514131/nanoscale-pressure-sensors-mimic-human-skin/
via: alexob

Nanoscale Pressure Sensors Mimic Human Skin



New research shows how arrays of tiny electronic devices can achieve human-skin-like sensitivity to mechanical force.

Why it matters: Better tactile sensing could lead to more adaptive robots and prosthetics.

The inventor of the technology, Zhong Lin Wang, a professor of materials science and engineering at Georgia Tech, says it has immediate applications in human-machine interfaces. For example, it could be used to capture electronic signatures by recording the distinctive force an individual applies while signing. Down the road, says Wang, his group’s pressure sensor arrays could equip robotics and prosthetics with a human-like sense of touch.”

More information: http://www.technologyreview.com/news/514131/nanoscale-pressure-sensors-mimic-human-skin/

via: alexob

(via robnapierdesign)

E-tattoo monitors brainwaves and baby bump

Mind reading can be as simple as slapping a sticker on your forehead. An “electronic tattoo” containing flexible electronic circuits can now record some complex brain activity as accurately as an EEG. The tattoo could also provide a cheap way to monitor a developing fetus.

The first electronic tattoo appeared in 2011, when Todd Coleman at the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues designed a transparent patch containing electronic circuits as thin as a human hair. Applied to skin like a temporary tattoo, these could be used to monitor electrophysiological signals associated with the heart and muscles, as well as rudimentary brain activity.

To improve its usefulness, Coleman’s group has now optimised the placement of the electrodes to pick up more complex brainwaves. They have demonstrated this by monitoring so-called P300 signals in the forebrain. These appear when you pay attention to a stimulus. The team showed volunteers a series of images and asked them to keep track of how many times a certain object appeared. Whenever volunteers noticed the object, the tattoo registered a blip in the P300 signal.

The tattoo was as good as conventional EEG at telling whether a person was looking at the target image or another stimulus, the team told a recent Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting in San Francisco.

The team is now modifying the tattoo to transmit data wirelessly to a smartphone, Coleman says. Eventually, he hopes the device could identify other complex patterns of brain activity, such as those that might be used to control a prosthetic limb.

For now, the group is focusing on optimising the tattoo for use in conditions such as depression and Alzheimer’s disease, each of which have characteristic patterns of neural activity. People with depression could wear the tattoo for an extended period, allowing it to help gauge whether medication is working. “The number one advantage is the medical ease of application,” says Michael Pitts of Reed College in Portland, Oregon.

Because its electronic components are already mass-produced, the tattoo can also be made very cheaply.

That means it might also lend itself to pregnancy monitoring in developing countries. With help from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Coleman’s group is working on an unobtrusive version of the tattoo that monitors signals such as maternal contractions and fetal heart rate.

via: neurosciencestuff:

Hologram-like 3-D brain helps researchers decode migraine pain
Wielding a joystick and wearing special glasses, pain researcher Alexandre DaSilva rotates and slices apart a large, colorful, 3-D brain floating in space before him.
Despite the white lab coat, it appears DaSilva’s playing the world’s most advanced virtual video game. The University of Michigan dentistry professor is actually hoping to better understand how our brains make their own pain-killing chemicals during a migraine attack.
The 3-D brain is a novel way to examine data from images taken during a patient’s actual migraine attack, says DaSilva, who heads the Headache and Orofacial Pain Effort at the U-M School of Dentistry and the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute.
Different colors in the 3-D brain give clues about chemical processes happening during a patient’s migraine attack using a PET scan, or positron emission tomography, a type of medical imaging.
“This high level of immersion (in 3-D) effectively places our investigators inside the actual patient’s brain image,” DaSilva said.
The 3-D research occurs in the U-M 3-D Lab, part of the U-M Library.
via: neurosciencestuff

Hologram-like 3-D brain helps researchers decode migraine pain

Wielding a joystick and wearing special glasses, pain researcher Alexandre DaSilva rotates and slices apart a large, colorful, 3-D brain floating in space before him.

Despite the white lab coat, it appears DaSilva’s playing the world’s most advanced virtual video game. The University of Michigan dentistry professor is actually hoping to better understand how our brains make their own pain-killing chemicals during a migraine attack.

The 3-D brain is a novel way to examine data from images taken during a patient’s actual migraine attack, says DaSilva, who heads the Headache and Orofacial Pain Effort at the U-M School of Dentistry and the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute.

Different colors in the 3-D brain give clues about chemical processes happening during a patient’s migraine attack using a PET scan, or positron emission tomography, a type of medical imaging.

“This high level of immersion (in 3-D) effectively places our investigators inside the actual patient’s brain image,” DaSilva said.

The 3-D research occurs in the U-M 3-D Lab, part of the U-M Library.

via: neurosciencestuff

In five years the number of wearable wireless health and fitness devices will hit 169.5 million, according to a report from ABI Research. ABI expects about 90 million wearable fitness devices to be in the market five years from now, which leaves about 80 million health-focused ones. (2012)