Pushing the Boundaries of 3D Printing: Featured Speaker Karl Willis
Karl Willis is no stranger to innovative technology. The Carnegie Mellon computational design graduate has worked with Microsoft, Disney and now Autodesk on research projects that explore the use of light, projection, motion and 3D printing to push the boundaries of art, science, design and technology. 
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"I research ways in which novel technology can promote and provoke playful experiences, everyday creativity, and new forms of social interaction," said Karl Willis.

Willis most recent research project with Microsoft looks at the way we can use 3D printers to embed information into objects. The project, called InfraStructs, tested embedding material-based passive tags into 3D printed objects. These objects could then be scanned using terahertz imaging devices. This type of technology could be used to enhance various applications from inventory control to real-time gaming.

In 2012, Karl and the team at Disney Research experimented with creating custom optical elements for interactive devices using 3D printers in a project called Printed Optics. In this project, interactive devices were 3D printed with embedded optical sensors which would illuminate and display. This project was part of a larger vision which proposed that we will someday be able to 3D print interactive devices on -demand in their entirety, negating the need for assembly of parts. 

Willis will be talking about digital fabrication and the various applications of embedding readable tags in objects at the Designers of Things conference which takes place in San Francisco September 23 & 24, 2014.
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This article is part of our featured speaker series for the Designers of Things Conference which takes place in San Francisco on September 23 & 24, 2014.  

Pushing the Boundaries of 3D Printing: Featured Speaker Karl Willis

Karl Willis is no stranger to innovative technology. The Carnegie Mellon computational design graduate has worked with Microsoft, Disney and now Autodesk on research projects that explore the use of light, projection, motion and 3D printing to push the boundaries of art, science, design and technology. 

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DisneyResearch Software Could Allow For 3D Printing of Toys at Home

"We developed an interactive design system that allows non-expert users to create animated mechanical characters. Given an articulated character as input, the user iteratively creates an animation by sketching motion curves indicating how different parts of the character should move. For each motion curve, our framework creates an optimized mechanism that reproduces it as closely as possible. The resulting mechanisms are attached to the character and then connected to each other using gear trains, which are created in a semi-automated fashion. The mechanical assemblies generated with our system can be driven with a single input driver, such as a hand-operated crank or an electric motor, and they can be fabricated using rapid prototyping devices.

We demonstrate the versatility of our approach by designing a wide range of mechanical characters, several of which we manufactured using 3D printing. While our pipeline is designed for characters driven by planar mechanisms, significant parts of it extend directly to non-planar mechanisms, allowing us to create characters with compelling 3D motions.”

Link to project page & press release:http://www.disneyresearch.com/project…

Computational Design of Mechanical Characters (by DisneyResearchHub)

via: threedeeprinting

Disney developing emotive 3D-printed eyes for robots
Disney Research has detailed a new technology that will allow robots to have expressive eyes. Based on the 3D printing tech Disney announced last year, Papillon uses bundles of printed optical fibers to guide light. By hooking the output end of the bundle up to a robot’s eye, researchers were able to project an image from the receiving end of the bundle and have it appear at the other end. 
via: thisistheverge

Disney developing emotive 3D-printed eyes for robots

Disney Research has detailed a new technology that will allow robots to have expressive eyes. Based on the 3D printing tech Disney announced last year, Papillon uses bundles of printed optical fibers to guide light. By hooking the output end of the bundle up to a robot’s eye, researchers were able to project an image from the receiving end of the bundle and have it appear at the other end. 

via: thisistheverge

Japanese Beverage Company Puts Disney Flip Book Style Animations on Bottles

Every now and then something low tech - like this Japanese Beverage Company putting Disney Flip Book Style animations on the their bottles - reminds me that not everything needs to have augmented reality, 3D printing or minority report-like qualities to leave you with a sense of wonder.

Sometimes magic happens just by turning a can.

via: laughingsquid

Temple Run + Wizard of Oz = App Magic

By Tom Emrich

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I am obsessed with Temple Run, especially Temple Run 2. I play it daily and, on my recent trip to Cancun, played it for the complete 4 hour flight on my iPad Mini (which I think hands down is the best device to play it on).

I am #1 for High Score against all my friends and am in the Top 5% of all Temple Run players according to Game Center. 

The mix of the music, simplicity of the game’s focus on coins and obstacles but mostly the fact that the character is constantly on the run that sends me into an exhilarated state every time I open the app.

To mark the new release of Oz: The Great and Powerful, Disney has teamed up with Temple Run to release a Temple Run Oz version. It’s $0.99 and has already shot up to the Top of the Paid App chart in the App Store. Disney was successful with this tactic for their movie Brave, which is still seeing success in the Top Paid apps - perhaps piggybacking off of the visibility that Oz is gaining.

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The Oz version of Temple Run leverages everything you love about Temple Run. The running, the coins, the power-ups, the jumping and tilting and sliding - but adds in elements of Oz including the yellow brick road, flying monkeys, hot air balloons and of course - the central character, the Wizard of Oz himself. The soundtrack, power-ups and game level scenes are all set in Oz and really set the tone for the overall game.

Disney also allows you to download the HD version of the game after downloading the initial app which really makes the visuals pop and I think adds to the game experience especially on the iPhone 5. 

Although I am extremely biased seeing that I love both Temple Run and have always had an affinity for the Wizard of Oz story - I would definitely recommend downloading and trying out the app. Right now the app is giving away 1500 coins which is usually an in-app purchase of $0.99 so its a wash when you buy the app for the same price. 

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You can check it out here: