Wearable Technology’s Impact on Human Health (Video)
Last week we introduced you to a new YouTube series on Wearable Tech from the Creators Project, a partnership between Intel and VICE. The series just published their second episode on Human Health. In this episode, we see how wearables are empowering patients with data to help them better understand themselves and how doctors will become analysts, equipped with the information they need to make more effective prescriptions. 
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The episode showcases many projects. Among them is the Checklist helmet, a partnership between Reebok and sensor firm, mc10. The duo have created a wearable helmet which shows sports players the degree of which they have suffered a hit from other players.
A project from Northeastern University is using wearables to help understand and identify autism within children. A sensor-based device continually captures a chil’s behavior which can then be mapped to a baseline to help identify precursors used in diagnosis.
One of the most powerful quotes from this video is from Dr. Robin Berzin of Health 2.0 who says:
"When somebody comes into my office I get this one minute look into what their life looks like. I get their vital signs and a certain gestalt of what’s going on with them, whether they are doing well or they are doing poorly. But I don’t know what the other 99% of their life looks like. And that’s the most important determinant of health. Patients are going to own this data. They are going to control it. And its going to be delivered to the medical community in a way that doctor’s can actually use to help them live healthier lives".
Wearables are already doing quite well in the health sector with some estimates suggesting that activity trackers or health based wearables make up more than 60% of the market to date. So we are definitely on the path the Creators Project depicts in this series.
Watch the video here:

Wearable Technology’s Impact on Human Health (Video)

Last week we introduced you to a new YouTube series on Wearable Tech from the Creators Project, a partnership between Intel and VICE. The series just published their second episode on Human Health. In this episode, we see how wearables are empowering patients with data to help them better understand themselves and how doctors will become analysts, equipped with the information they need to make more effective prescriptions. 

Read More

iWatch Rumour Round-up
It wouldn’t be another year without another round of rumours for the much coveted yet never confirmed iWatch. Apple has yet to get into the wearable tech space despite the fact that HTC, Acer and Asus have confirmed they will be joining Sony, Samsung and Google in tech that people wear. But that hasn’t stopped the internet from surmising what the iWatch could be all about. Here are some of the latest rumours floating around about Apple’s possible next big thing.
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Current rumoured specs are 1.5 or 2-inch display, Curved form factor, Full iOS, Biometrics and others sensors, 4-5 day battery life
Todd Ham envisions an iOS meets Nike FuelBand touch screen bracelet that we just wish would be here already (pictured above or video below)
Apple projected to ship 65M iWatch units priced at $199 for an estimated $17.5 Billion dollar business in 12 months (this is as much as the iPad and iPhone’s first year combined)
Apple will be using Stepped Battery technology from LG
Apple is testing solar, motion and induction charging 
Healthbook iOS 8 app will be linked to the iWatch will have a huge focus on health and fitness
New hires point to use of iWatch for health and fitness, possibly including heart rate monitoring in the device

iWatch Rumour Round-up

It wouldn’t be another year without another round of rumours for the much coveted yet never confirmed iWatch. Apple has yet to get into the wearable tech space despite the fact that HTC, Acer and Asus have confirmed they will be joining Sony, Samsung and Google in tech that people wear. But that hasn’t stopped the internet from surmising what the iWatch could be all about. Here are some of the latest rumours floating around about Apple’s possible next big thing.

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Goodbye Pedometers! Activity Trackers Get Heart
The majority of wearable devices on the arms of consumers today are used for fitness and health. Fitbit, Jawbone, Nike and Lumobody are all seeing success with sensors that track steps, monitor your sleep and try to motivate you to get up and move.
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Up until now, fitness wearables have mostly only measured motion using an accelerometer and gyroscope making them arguably just modern-day pedometers. But the days of solely counting steps may soon be over. This year’s CES unveiled a new breed of health wearables which go beyond measuring our external behavior and start to look inside to gauge our health.
LG, Intel and Epson all showed off new activity tracking wearables which had the ability to measure heart rate. Both LG and Intel announced a set of heart rate monitoring earbuds. LG’s headset will have the ability to interact with their new OLED display wristband, Lifeband Touch. Epson also stepped into the heart rate measurement game with the launch of Pulsense, a line of optical heart rate sensor devices including a smartwatch and wristband.
But heart rate wasn’t the only physiological activity wearables were detecting in Vegas. InteraXon was demoing their Muse, a brain-sensing headband which uses EEG sensors to monitor and measure your brain activity. The data gathered from your brain was then used in an app called Calm which walks users through exercises aimed to quiet the mind in a form of futuristic meditation.

Heapsylon’s Sensoria Smart Socks were being used to tell runners how well their feet were doing by tracking things like balance, landing position and cadence.
A focus on more accurate data sets of wearables for quantified selfers is a very exciting and necessary step in the right direction. Giving consumers access to medical-grade data will only continue to increase the value of these devices and the wearable tech sector as a whole.

Goodbye Pedometers! Activity Trackers Get Heart

The majority of wearable devices on the arms of consumers today are used for fitness and health. Fitbit, Jawbone, Nike and Lumobody are all seeing success with sensors that track steps, monitor your sleep and try to motivate you to get up and move.

Read More

Digital Health: Wearables, Ingestables and Beyond (Infographic)
The health industry is being completely disrupted by sensors, especially those found in wearable technology. We are seeing tons of activity and fitness trackers like Fitbit and Nike FuelBand keeping tabs on our movement. And many new devices are also starting to measure our heart rate too. But changes to digital health go far beyond just wearables.
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This infographic from InsuranceQuotes.com does a great job at summarizing some of the most influential wristbands and accessories changing the face of health from a wearable technology perspective. 
But as it points out, it isn’t just wearables that will be making an impact on how we monitor and manage our health. Ingestable sensors in the shape of swallowable pills may soon be a common prescription from your doctor to monitor your insides.
InsuranceQuotes breaks down some of the pros and cons of gathering such intimate information of a patient, including concerns many have raised over the use of this data to influence insurance rates.

Digital Health: Wearables, Ingestables and Beyond (Infographic)

The health industry is being completely disrupted by sensors, especially those found in wearable technology. We are seeing tons of activity and fitness trackers like Fitbit and Nike FuelBand keeping tabs on our movement. And many new devices are also starting to measure our heart rate too. But changes to digital health go far beyond just wearables.

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AIRO Spectrometer & Heart Rate Monitoring Wristband Launches Today

The KW-based startup, Airo Health, launched their wristband, AIRO, today which will automatically monitor your nutrition, stress, sleep and exercise. 

Unlike other activity trackers, the wristband doesn’t use motion but uses a spectrometer to analyze metabolites in your blood (for food) and the heart rate monitor to gauge intensity of your workouts, quality of your sleep and your HRV or heart rate variability for how stressed you are.

Pre-orders start today for $149.99. The device is expected to ship in the Fall of 2014.

Source: BetaKit

#FutureHome Nutrima

Electrolux Design Lab 2013

Nutrima calculates the nutritional values, possible toxins and freshness of your food. The appliance is foldable, easy to bring along and supported by an app mapping your experiences giving tips of resellers with high quality ingredients.

 www.electroluxdesignlab.com

(via internetofth)

Defibrillator Equipped Drones Speed Treatment To Those In Need - PSFK
When someone is having a cardiac arrhythmia, getting an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to that person as quickly as possible can often be the difference between life and death. The problem is that AEDs are usually only readily available in high pedestrian traffic areas such as airports or sports stadiums, due to the cost of each device. In less populated areas, it can sometimes take hours for the necessary equipment to arrive. Imagine if there was a quick and easy way to get the lifesaving tools to someone in need, faster than any ambulance or EMT.
The Defikopter is a drone that can deliver a defibrillator to heart attack victims much quicker than emergency responders. Conceived by Germany-based nonprofit Definetz, the system can carry an AED to any location based on its GPS coordinates. Although the system is still in the early stages of development, the team are developing a smartphone app that those with heart problems, or their family, can download and have on hand in case of emergency.
via: smarterplanet

Defibrillator Equipped Drones Speed Treatment To Those In Need - PSFK

When someone is having a cardiac arrhythmia, getting an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to that person as quickly as possible can often be the difference between life and death. The problem is that AEDs are usually only readily available in high pedestrian traffic areas such as airports or sports stadiums, due to the cost of each device. In less populated areas, it can sometimes take hours for the necessary equipment to arrive. Imagine if there was a quick and easy way to get the lifesaving tools to someone in need, faster than any ambulance or EMT.

The Defikopter is a drone that can deliver a defibrillator to heart attack victims much quicker than emergency responders. Conceived by Germany-based nonprofit Definetz, the system can carry an AED to any location based on its GPS coordinates. Although the system is still in the early stages of development, the team are developing a smartphone app that those with heart problems, or their family, can download and have on hand in case of emergency.

via: smarterplanet

How 3D Printing Is Impacting Healthcare

Texas news does a piece on how 3D Printing is helping to prepare surgeons for surgery by providing them with 3D models on demand. They also touch upon bio-printing (very early days here).

3D printers have been around since the early 80s but the personal 3D printer is really making this twenty year technology available to the masses.

seattle-gadgets:

Owen Conflenti: 3D Printing Body Parts (by Jason Notoras)

(via seattle-gadgets-deactivated2013)

LUMO Wearable Tech Wants You to Sit Up Straight

How many times did you hear “sit up straight” from your Mom when you grew up? Well LUMO wants to be your virtual mom by tracking your posture and “shocking you” into a better position. 

LUMO is a band with sensors that monitors and tracks your posture. You wear the band around your waist and it connects to your smartphone using Bluetooth (like most wearables today).

Here is what LUMO says needs to happen to make their product work:

"1. Activate LUMOback’s Posture Monitoring App: Download the LUMOback app from the Apple App Store and follow the instructions in the app. The app will take you through a short series of movements to do the initial calibration (e.g. walking, sitting, slouching, etc.).  In less than 5 minutes, you’ll be on the path to good posture!

2. Wear: LUMOback is a small, flexible sensor that attaches to a thin and flexible belt. Strap the belt around your lower back, either against your skin or over a thin layer or clothing.

3. Track: LUMOback’s sensors measure pelvic tilt and help guide your body position to a neutral pelvis alignment. If you slouch with your lower back, lean forward, lean backwards, or shift your weight to one side, the LUMOback will let you know via a gentle vibration so you can learn to correct your stance to good posture. LUMOback also offers tracking  to help you understand your posture now, your daily activity levels, your sleep habits, and your improvements over time.”

I have a constant war with my posture being at my computer for 10 hours a day and then straight from there to a mobile device so I can totally see value in tracking and reminding myself of my posture digitally. 

The health and fitness sector is booming with wearables and so its great to see orthopedic type applications come out to the market.

You can buy the device now for $149.00USD.

Check out the video for more features and a demo.

AR in the ER

recipeforawesome:

(via Augmented Reality App Guides Surgeons During Tumor Removal - PSFK)

Tablets and smartphones have recently found a wide range of uses in the healthcare industry, from building image databases for doctors to helping patients better understand their surgical procedures. Taking these mobile technologies one step further, we look at an application that takes augmented reality into the operating room to assist doctors with complex procedures. Imagine if at the touch of a button, your surgeon could map your internal organs and pinpoint the correct blood vessel or location of a tumor, rather than having to rely on memory or constantly refer to images and charts.

A new iPad app from the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Germany is using augmented reality technology to help surgeons remove liver tumors without damaging critical vessels within the organ. Before the surgery takes place, a CT scan is performed on the patient, allowing an accompanying software to identify and image the pathways of blood vessels. This information is then transferred to an iPad, which can be used during the surgery.

Is That a Tiny Coach on Your Basketball or Are You Just Happy To See Me
via thisistheverge: There’s a tiny coach in your basketball
There are tons of gadgets to help golfers develop the perfect swing, but it’s hard to apply the same unobtrusive training tools to other sports. Evo One, though, is the counterpoint — it’s a Kickstarter project that puts a tiny coach inside a basketball to help players improve their game. A small gyroscopic sensor detects backspin and emits a whistle when the ball is shot correctly, allowing players to make corrections as they play. 

Is That a Tiny Coach on Your Basketball or Are You Just Happy To See Me

via thisisthevergeThere’s a tiny coach in your basketball

There are tons of gadgets to help golfers develop the perfect swing, but it’s hard to apply the same unobtrusive training tools to other sports. Evo One, though, is the counterpoint — it’s a Kickstarter project that puts a tiny coach inside a basketball to help players improve their game. A small gyroscopic sensor detects backspin and emits a whistle when the ball is shot correctly, allowing players to make corrections as they play. 

5 Body Parts Scientists Can 3-D Print
Ears
Team: Cornell University
How it’s made: Bioengineers take a 3-D scan of a child’s ear, design a seven-part mold in the SolidWorks CAD program, and print the pieces. The mold is injected with a high-density gel made from 250 million bovine cartilage cells and collagen from rat tails (the latter serves as a scaffold). After 15 minutes, the ear is removed and incubated in cell culture for several days. In three months, the cartilage will have propagated enough to replace the collagen.
Benefit: At least one child in 12,500 is born with microtia, a condition characterized by hearing loss due to an underdeveloped or malformed outer ear. Unlike synthetic implants, ears grown from human cells are more likely to be successfully incorporated into the body.
See Slideshow
via: thenewenlightenmentage:

5 Body Parts Scientists Can 3-D Print

Ears

Team: Cornell University

How it’s made: Bioengineers take a 3-D scan of a child’s ear, design a seven-part mold in the SolidWorks CAD program, and print the pieces. The mold is injected with a high-density gel made from 250 million bovine cartilage cells and collagen from rat tails (the latter serves as a scaffold). After 15 minutes, the ear is removed and incubated in cell culture for several days. In three months, the cartilage will have propagated enough to replace the collagen.

Benefit: At least one child in 12,500 is born with microtia, a condition characterized by hearing loss due to an underdeveloped or malformed outer ear. Unlike synthetic implants, ears grown from human cells are more likely to be successfully incorporated into the body.

See Slideshow

via: thenewenlightenmentage:

World’s lightest and thinnest organic circuits

prostheticknowledge:

Imperceptible Electronics

Incredibly thin, light, maleable and cheap circuitry developed with plenty of possible uses - video embedded below:

Via DigInfo:

Researchers from Asia and Europe have developed the world’s lightest and thinnest organic circuits, which in the future could be used in a range of healthcare applications.

Lighter than a feather, these ultrathin film-like organic transistor integrated circuits are being developed by a research group led by Professor Takao Someya and Associate Professor Tsuyoshi Sekitani of the University of Tokyo, who run an Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO) program sponsored by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), in collaboration with Siegfried Bauer’s group at the Johannes Kepler University (JKU) Linz, Austria.

The circuits are extremely lightweight, flexible, durable and thin, and conform to any surface. They are just 2 microns thick, just 1/5 that of kitchen wrap, and weighing only 3g/m^2, are 30 times lighter than office paper. They also feature a bend radius of 5 microns, meaning they can be scrunched up into a ball, without breaking. Due to these properties the researchers have dubbed them “imperceptible electronics”, which can be placed on any surface and even worn without restricting the users movement.

More Here

Handheld sensor detects stress and teaches users to control it
Gamification is known to be effective in encouraging positive habits when it comes to health, as devices such as the T-Haler have demonstrated. Having recently reached its funding target on Kickstarter, the PIP is a device that senses stress when held in the hand and can be used to control video game characters that teach users how to manage their anxiety. READ MORE…
via: springwise

Handheld sensor detects stress and teaches users to control it

Gamification is known to be effective in encouraging positive habits when it comes to health, as devices such as the T-Haler have demonstrated. Having recently reached its funding target on Kickstarter, the PIP is a device that senses stress when held in the hand and can be used to control video game characters that teach users how to manage their anxiety. READ MORE…

via: springwise

Personal tracking devices dominate digital health crowdfunding dollars (so far) in 2013
Including:
Scanadu’s medical scanner, Scout, $1.2 million on indiegogo
Misfit Wearables’ activity tracker, Shine, $847K on indiegogo
amiigo’s fitness bracelet, $581K on indiegogo
Radiate’s smart workout shirt, $580K on Kickstarter
Hapilabs’ smart fork, HAPIfork, $135K on Kickstarter
Full Story: MedCity
via emergentfutures:

Personal tracking devices dominate digital health crowdfunding dollars (so far) in 2013

Including:

Full Story: MedCity

via emergentfutures: