Turning Trash Into Treasure with 3D Printing
A Seattle entrepreneur wants to take recycling to a whole new level. Working together with a local inventor, she has developed a machine that turns plastic bottles into 3D printing filament allowing makers to literally turn their trash into newly created treasures. 
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Founder Liz Havlin is currently preparing a Kickstarter campaign to create an open sourced desktop recycling machine called the Legacy Filament Extruder. The machine turns recycled plastic pellets into 3D printer ink. Havlin hopes to raise $30,000 to make this concept a reality.
The machine is just one part of the equation. Havlin has partnered with a company who will take collected recycled plastic and make the necessary pellets needed to create the filament using the Legacy. This partnership removes the need for additional machinery to be created or bought to processes the plastics itself.  
Once things are up and running, Havlin aims to be able to collect recycling at a location in Seattle, exchange it for pellets and then sell 3D printer filaments created by the extruder.
The Legacy could be the start of a new way to tackle a huge environmental problem which continues to plague our oceans and our wildlife. In addition, as Havlin points out on her draft Kickstarter page, the collection of plastics and other recycling is already a means for people to earn money to help them lift themselves out of poverty. The use of these materials for a growing demand of makers could help further this social cause as well. 
via VentureBeat

Turning Trash Into Treasure with 3D Printing

A Seattle entrepreneur wants to take recycling to a whole new level. Working together with a local inventor, she has developed a machine that turns plastic bottles into 3D printing filament allowing makers to literally turn their trash into newly created treasures. 

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Pushing the Boundaries of 3D Printing: Featured Speaker Karl Willis
Karl Willis is no stranger to innovative technology. The Carnegie Mellon computational design graduate has worked with Microsoft, Disney and now Autodesk on research projects that explore the use of light, projection, motion and 3D printing to push the boundaries of art, science, design and technology. 
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"I research ways in which novel technology can promote and provoke playful experiences, everyday creativity, and new forms of social interaction," said Karl Willis.

Willis most recent research project with Microsoft looks at the way we can use 3D printers to embed information into objects. The project, called InfraStructs, tested embedding material-based passive tags into 3D printed objects. These objects could then be scanned using terahertz imaging devices. This type of technology could be used to enhance various applications from inventory control to real-time gaming.

In 2012, Karl and the team at Disney Research experimented with creating custom optical elements for interactive devices using 3D printers in a project called Printed Optics. In this project, interactive devices were 3D printed with embedded optical sensors which would illuminate and display. This project was part of a larger vision which proposed that we will someday be able to 3D print interactive devices on -demand in their entirety, negating the need for assembly of parts. 

Willis will be talking about digital fabrication and the various applications of embedding readable tags in objects at the Designers of Things conference which takes place in San Francisco September 23 & 24, 2014.
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This article is part of our featured speaker series for the Designers of Things Conference which takes place in San Francisco on September 23 & 24, 2014.  

Pushing the Boundaries of 3D Printing: Featured Speaker Karl Willis

Karl Willis is no stranger to innovative technology. The Carnegie Mellon computational design graduate has worked with Microsoft, Disney and now Autodesk on research projects that explore the use of light, projection, motion and 3D printing to push the boundaries of art, science, design and technology. 

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It’s a Bird…It’s a Plane…It’s a 3D Printed Drone!
Our skies may soon be filled with drones that we print ourselves. Engineers at the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) at the University of Sheffield have successfully printed a 1.5m-wide drone, and it can fly!
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The 2KG thermoplastic nine-part drone was made without supporting materials and was printed and assembled within 24 hours. Its success suggests that disposable drones (or UAVs: unmanned aerial vehicles) could someday be printed out and deployed in remote areas in as little as a day.
With its test flight under its wing (pun intended) the team are already looking to improve upon the 3D printed model to use a new nylon rather than polymer material and incorporate GPS and camera features that would allow operators wearing first person-view goggles to control the device.

Source Gizmodo via sUAS
Image & Video Source sUAS

It’s a Bird…It’s a Plane…It’s a 3D Printed Drone!

Our skies may soon be filled with drones that we print ourselves. Engineers at the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) at the University of Sheffield have successfully printed a 1.5m-wide drone, and it can fly!

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3D Printed Measuring Tape: No Assembly Required  (Video)

We have seen a lot of things being created using a 3D Printer lately. Some huge projects like the Kayak and the House. But this project from a Californian Engineer is possibly the most elaborate. He has successfully printed a tape measure already assembled. 

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World’s First 3D Printed Kayak Stays Afloat!
Last week we covered the world’s first 3D printed house. This week we have another 3D first, a 3D printed Kayak. These large scale prints are proving the vast potential 3D printing has in democratizing manufacturing of just about anything we can imagine. 
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This 3D printed water vehicle is the brain child of Jim Smith of Grass Roots Engineering which he started to show developments and continual improvements using his large scale 3D printers.
The 16ft Kayak is made of 28 sections of ABS plastic and put together with machine screws, brass threaded inserts and a little bit of silicone caulk. At just $500, this boat took a whopping 42 days to print but it was well worth it since the creator has confirmed it floats! 

Image source: Grass Roots Engineering

World’s First 3D Printed Kayak Stays Afloat!

Last week we covered the world’s first 3D printed house. This week we have another 3D first, a 3D printed Kayak. These large scale prints are proving the vast potential 3D printing has in democratizing manufacturing of just about anything we can imagine. 

Read More

1 in 3 American Homes Ready for 3D Printer
Move over dot matrix and laser printers, American’s are making room in their home office for 3D Printers. A new report published by Forbes has found that one in three Americans would consider a 3D printer for their home this year, most of these Millennials are those aged between18 and 24. 
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The report is from CEL Robox, a 3D printer company who successfully funded its printer back in December 2013 on Kickstarter. The company worked with research agency OnePoll to survey 1,000 U.S. consumers.
The report also detailed what consumers are most interested in doing with their 3D printer. Of those that would buy a printer this year, 65% said they were interested in creating and printing customized items for their home.
The most common reasons for wanting a 3D printer were to print items rather than purchasing them in a store (36%) and to print out items to help fix things around the house (35%). 
But many also wanted to get quite crafty, with one in three people to use 3D printers to create personalized gifts for people including wedding favours.
With the likes of Amazon and Staples selling 3D printers and lower cost options (under $1K) becoming available for sale, its only a matter of time before 3D printers become a common appliance in the everyday home. So starting making room on your desk.  

1 in 3 American Homes Ready for 3D Printer

Move over dot matrix and laser printers, American’s are making room in their home office for 3D Printers. A new report published by Forbes has found that one in three Americans would consider a 3D printer for their home this year, most of these Millennials are those aged between18 and 24. 

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Print Your Cup and Fill It With Coffee at Berlin’s First 3D Printer Cafe
3D printers are fantastic new tools for creators, but you have to have loads of patience. A 3D printed object can take hours to build one the job is kicked off. So what better way to kill time while waiting for your creation to take shape then to grab a coffee and a meal. This is the idea behind Berlin’s first 3D printing cafe, DimensionAlley.
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DimensionAlley is a cafe meets 3D printing maker space. The family-owned business is on a mission to make 3D printers more accessible to the public by connecting them with this technology in a warm and friendly environment.
The cafe uses a MakerBot Replicator, a Makerbot Replicator 2, an Ultimake 2, and a 3D scanner to 3D print. And the menu is filled with java, pies, cornish pastries and english teas. 

DimensionAlley has posted a portfolio of the 3D printed objects created at the cafe. Among them are figurines, iPhone cases and vases. You can check them all out here.
Image Source: DimensionAlley

Print Your Cup and Fill It With Coffee at Berlin’s First 3D Printer Cafe

3D printers are fantastic new tools for creators, but you have to have loads of patience. A 3D printed object can take hours to build one the job is kicked off. So what better way to kill time while waiting for your creation to take shape then to grab a coffee and a meal. This is the idea behind Berlin’s first 3D printing cafe, DimensionAlley.

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The World’s First 3D Printed House (Video)
Dutch architects are using a 3D printer to build a house using the world’s largest portable 3D printer. The 20-foot tall printer is suspended in a large metal tower they call the “Kamermaker” (translation room maker) where all the magic happens.  
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The 3D printer will print pieces of the Canal House which will then need to be put together like a larger than life Lego set. It takes the Kamermaker about one week to print each piece.

According to the Time Magazine article the first block which was one corner of the building a a part of the stairway weighed around 400 pounds. 
The house is expected to take three years to print.
Watch the Canal House build in action. 

Image & Video Sources: Facebook, I Love Noord

The World’s First 3D Printed House (Video)

Dutch architects are using a 3D printer to build a house using the world’s largest portable 3D printer. The 20-foot tall printer is suspended in a large metal tower they call the “Kamermaker” (translation room maker) where all the magic happens.  

Read More

Turn Any Pair of Glasses Into Google Glass Frames With This 3D Printed Solution
Last month, Google launched four new stylish frames for Google Glass each retailing $225 plus the cost of prescription lenses. As Glass is already $1500 this can get pretty costly. But it doesn’t have to be this way. You can make any pair of regular glasses compatible with Glass for pennies if you have access to a 3D printer.
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A 3D printed plastic adapter is all you need to clamp Glass onto your pair of Glasses. The adapter will cost you under a dollar. To create the adapter you’ll need a 3D printer and the files for the adapter unit which you can find over on the creators, Noe & Pedro, Adafruit Learning System page. The clip should take no more than half an hour to print.  
To attach it to Google Glass you will need to remove the lens-free band that comes with Glass first. Using a T5 screwdriver, all you need to do is loosen the screw found where your right temple would be on Glass and then gently pull the frame from the actual device. 
Once your original frame has been removed from Glass and your new clip has been printed you are ready to assemble. Full details on how to ensure you install your Glass-hack properly are found on Adafruit. 
Obviously this lifehack can save you tons of money. And if you already have a pair of glasses you need to see with, it can only make your Glass experience that much better!

VIA TechCrunch

Turn Any Pair of Glasses Into Google Glass Frames With This 3D Printed Solution

Last month, Google launched four new stylish frames for Google Glass each retailing $225 plus the cost of prescription lenses. As Glass is already $1500 this can get pretty costly. But it doesn’t have to be this way. You can make any pair of regular glasses compatible with Glass for pennies if you have access to a 3D printer.

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Cut Copy Releases First 3D Printed Music Video
The music industry has been quick to use 3D printing to market new albums. Back in December we reported that Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke 3D printed vinyl records at a pop-up shop in London to mark the release of his LP. Indie-electronic band, Cut Copy, recently released a music video which used 3D printers to create the starring characters of their new music video “We Are Explorers”.
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The video features two miniature neon green cubist-like characters walking around the streets of LA, which happened to be life size. The video is shot in a stop-motion like manner. 
According to ToneDeaf, “To get the mini-explorers to glow, the figurines were printed in a special UV-reactive material so that when Director of Photography Sesse Lind shot them at night, under black light bulbs, they gave off the necessary fluoro effect”.
But Cut Copy isn’t just using 3D printers to create elements in their video. They are also encouraging their fans to recreate these little guys by giving them access to a BitTorrent Bundle which features the 3D printing files, footage, storyboards, stop-motion schematics and the music. The hope is that people will print the characters and be inspired to shoot their own footage as part of a fan-artist collaboration experience.

Cut Copy - We Are Explorers Music Video

Cut Copy Releases First 3D Printed Music Video

The music industry has been quick to use 3D printing to market new albums. Back in December we reported that Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke 3D printed vinyl records at a pop-up shop in London to mark the release of his LP. Indie-electronic band, Cut Copy, recently released a music video which used 3D printers to create the starring characters of their new music video “We Are Explorers”.

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The New Ford Mustang Is So Good You Could Eat It, Literally!
Ford has partnered up with 3D Systems to do something historic…make a car that people can eat. Ok it’s not a fully functional car, in fact it’s only about one inch in length, but it is an exact 3D Printed replica of the new Ford Mustang made out of candy and chocolate.
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In January, 3D Systems announced a kitchen-ready 3D printer category for edibles in a new line for them called ChefJet. Both work similar to regular 3D printers but use confectionary to print in monochrome or full color to create cake toppers or basically anything you dream of in various flavours. The monochrome unit is expected to retail for under $5,000 while the full color unit will be almost double the price.
Around this time, 3D Systems also announced their partnership with Hershey’s chocolate which will result in various 3D printed edibles and new printers to come out in the next couple years.
The Ford partnership is a fantastic example of how brands can take advantage of 3D Food printers to raise some awareness of their products in a fun and futuristic way. Ford said that they used this opportunity to highlight that they employ 3D printing technology in the development of all their vehicles, of course not with chocolate and also using industrial machines rather than the home units. 
Ford put out a video of the candy printing process to showcase the final product on YouTube which we have for you below. 

The New Ford Mustang Is So Good You Could Eat It, Literally!

Ford has partnered up with 3D Systems to do something historic…make a car that people can eat. Ok it’s not a fully functional car, in fact it’s only about one inch in length, but it is an exact 3D Printed replica of the new Ford Mustang made out of candy and chocolate.

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3D Systems Prints First Hybrid Robotic Exoskeleton
Since CES, 3D Systems has made some big announcements proving that 3D printing is more than just for creating trinkets like iPhone cases. The 3D printing company has partnered with the likes of Hershey and Hasbro to kick off the use of 3D printers to make candy and toys. This week they announced teaming up with EskoBionics to collaborate on the first 3D printed hybrid Exoskeleton. 
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The 3D printed Exoskeleton was presented at the Singularity University event in Budapest. It was custom printed for Amanda Boxtel, an American woman who became paralyzed from the waist down due to a ski accident back in 1992. Boxtel wore the exoskeleton and walked around during the event.

“After years of dreaming about it, I am deeply grateful and thrilled to be making history by walking tall in the first ever 3D printed Ekso-Suit, made specifically for me,” said Amanda Boxtel. 3D Systems was able to get the perfect fit for the robotic suit using 3D scanning to digitize Boxtel’s body. 


This isn’t the first time 3D System devices have been used for medical purposes. Their devices have assisted many have been used for many other medical purposes such as preoperative surgery, surgical drill and saw guides, dentistry and orthodontics.

“3DS has long been a pioneer in patient-specific devices, integrating our cutting-edge 3D capabilities with robotics to better serve humanity opens new and unimaginable frontiers,” said Avi Reichental, President and CEO of 3DS.

3D Systems Prints First Hybrid Robotic Exoskeleton

Since CES, 3D Systems has made some big announcements proving that 3D printing is more than just for creating trinkets like iPhone cases. The 3D printing company has partnered with the likes of Hershey and Hasbro to kick off the use of 3D printers to make candy and toys. This week they announced teaming up with EskoBionics to collaborate on the first 3D printed hybrid Exoskeleton. 

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Five 3D Printed Valentines Day Gifts for Under $15
Valentines Day is tomorrow and what better way to show your love than through a 3D printed token. We’ve scoured popular 3D printing marketplace, Shapeways, to find our five favorite Valentine’s day gifts all for under $15. 
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1. HeartHands Sculpture
This set of dark purple colored nylon plastic hands making a heart is definitely a vibrant and unique way to say “I Love You”. Best yet, this sculpture will only set you back $2.56 plus shipping. Not a fan of purple, the hands also come in blue, red and pink as well as a series of metallic finishes.  

2. Nylander Rose
Why buy flowers that will just die in a couple of days? This 2-inch diameter solid 3D printed flower will last forever which is a steal at $11.19. If you really want to show your love you could get a bunch to make a bouquet. The designer is offering roses in white, violet, and red. 

3. ElephantLovely
In a long distance relationship and miss your love, this cute little anatomically correct Elephant trinket shows how your heart is just filled with butterflies waiting for their return. The Elephant comes in array of finishes with the full colored material with coarse finish priced at $13.86.

4. Valentine Keychain Kissing Couple
Personalize your love with this Valentine’s day keychain featuring two heart halves kissing each, branded with your names on their backs. This keychain will only set you back $13.95 for the full colored version. 

5. Darth Vader Funeral Tea Light Holder
If you’d rather take a more quirky, untraditional route to gift giving this V-day, this Star Wars inspired tea light holder will do the trick. Setting the mood while enjoying one of the best scenes from this classic film series is a win-win. The candle holder is only $12.75 and comes in black nylon plastic. 

Five 3D Printed Valentines Day Gifts for Under $15

Valentines Day is tomorrow and what better way to show your love than through a 3D printed token. We’ve scoured popular 3D printing marketplace, Shapeways, to find our five favorite Valentine’s day gifts all for under $15. 

Read More

Turn Your 3D Printer Into The Ultimate Air Hockey Opponent
If you thought your 3D printer was just a tool to create iPhone cases and plastic Yoda heads you will want to get some inspiration from ultimate Maker Jose Julio. Julio turned his RepRap 3D printer into an Air Hockey Robot and it’s pretty awesome.
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Jose built the robot using parts from the RepRap 3D printer which included an Arduino board, motor cables and connectors and a PS3 Eye Camera. And when combined with a hand-made Air Hockey table, the result is magical!
If you are interested in learning how to go about building your own Air Hockey Robot out of a 3D printer head on over to Jose’s instructional Google Doc.
In the meantime, check out the robot’s wicked Air Hockey Defence in the video below. 

Turn Your 3D Printer Into The Ultimate Air Hockey Opponent

If you thought your 3D printer was just a tool to create iPhone cases and plastic Yoda heads you will want to get some inspiration from ultimate Maker Jose Julio. Julio turned his RepRap 3D printer into an Air Hockey Robot and it’s pretty awesome.

Read More

The Future is Filled With Kisses and Kit Kats You Print Yourself
It looks like the chocolate and confectionary business is prime for disruption. Last week we covered Cadbury’s use of wearable tech to create a jacket that mimics the joy of eating chocolate. Today’s story features a new partnership between The Hershey Company and 3D Systems to deliver 3D printed edibles.
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The Hershey Company, makers of the infamous Hershey’s Kisses and (in the US) the Kit Kat bar, announced last week that they have formed a multi-year partnership with 3D printer leader, 3D Systems. The alliance will see Hershey’s and 3D Systems “explore and develop innovative opportunities for using 3D printing technology in creating edible foods, including confectionery treats”.
News of this partnership lacked details around the financial commitment between the parties. There was also no information on specific projects we may expect to see in the next year or two from this alliance. But The Hershey Company and 3D Systems did confirm that they will be co-developing a variety of 3D printed chocolate and non-chocolate products. And that they will be working together to commercialize a new class of consumer and prosumer 3D printers.
Earlier this month at CES, 3D Systems unveiled their first kitchen-ready 3D printer, the ChefJet, which currently prints milk chocolate and a variety of candy flavours like Sour Apple.
3D printing is set to democratize manufacturing, bringing it home to the masses. These types of partnerships may suggest that in the very near future, we will simply press print to get a chocolate bar instead of heading out to the store to get one. 
Image Source: 3Dprinthq

The Future is Filled With Kisses and Kit Kats You Print Yourself

It looks like the chocolate and confectionary business is prime for disruption. Last week we covered Cadbury’s use of wearable tech to create a jacket that mimics the joy of eating chocolate. Today’s story features a new partnership between The Hershey Company and 3D Systems to deliver 3D printed edibles.

Read More