Netflix Releases Print the Legend Documentary Trailer (Video)
There is no denying that 3D printing is a disruptive technology which has the potential of truly changing many verticals from manufacturing to health. Netflix’s newest documentary, “Print the Legend”, explores the companies and people behind the growing 3D printing movement. This week, Netflix released the trailer to this film which will be available on the streaming network September 26. 
[[MORE]]The documentary takes a look at some of the innovative companies making 3D printing accessible to the masses including MakerBot and FormLabs. It also dives deep into some of the more controversial stories we’ve seen surrounding this technology including the 3D printed guns and printing prosthetic hands for those in need.
"Print the Legend" originally showed at SXSW and won the special jury recognition award for editing and storytelling. We’ve got to admit that just from the trailer alone you leave feeling like something pretty powerful is happening with this technology. We’ve got the trailer for you below or you can hit this link

Netflix Releases Print the Legend Documentary Trailer (Video)

There is no denying that 3D printing is a disruptive technology which has the potential of truly changing many verticals from manufacturing to health. Netflix’s newest documentary, “Print the Legend”, explores the companies and people behind the growing 3D printing movement. This week, Netflix released the trailer to this film which will be available on the streaming network September 26. 

Read More

World’s First 3D Printed Car Live Printed This Week, Driven Saturday
We have seen houses, castles and even canoes created by 3D printers and so seeing a fully functional car in this list makes total sense. History will be made this week as Local Motors live prints the first 3D printer car followed by its first drive this Saturday. The print is expected to be 44 hours in length and will take place in Chicago at The International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS).
[[MORE]]
Called Strati, the vehicle will be printed in one piece while the internal components will be sourced from other suppliers. All pieces will be assembled by global co-creation company, Local Motors who are most known for creating the off-road desert racer, The Rally Fighter. 
“The Strati was designed by our community, made in our Microfactory, and will be driven by you,” said John B. Rogers, Jr., CEO of Local Motors. “This brand-new process disrupts the manufacturing status quo, changes the consumer experience, and proves that a car can be born in an entirely different way.” 
Following the show, Local Motors will continue using 3D printers in its car creation. They intend to launch production level 3D printed vehicles for purchase in the months following the show.

World’s First 3D Printed Car Live Printed This Week, Driven Saturday

We have seen houses, castles and even canoes created by 3D printers and so seeing a fully functional car in this list makes total sense. History will be made this week as Local Motors live prints the first 3D printer car followed by its first drive this Saturday. The print is expected to be 44 hours in length and will take place in Chicago at The International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS).

Read More

Last Week to Register for DoT 2014 with Special Pricing
Advance rates for Designers of Things expire Friday, September 12. Register this week to save up to $150 on your VIP, Tech or Demo Pass.
All pass holders will gain access to the Demo Hall, featuring cutting-edge technologies from innovative companies, including Autodesk, Freescale and Grid Connect. Join them and other participating companies to learn about new products, interact with designers and developers, and establish relationships with the brightest minds in wearable tech, 3D printing and IoT. Additionally, pass holders are invited to attend on-site parties hosted by Shapeways and Proto Labs after the Demo Hall closes on Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively.
[[MORE]]
VIP and Tech pass holders can also access a wide range of talks, intensives and workshops covering these technologies, including: Designing for 24/7 Wearability with Nirav “Rav” Sheth  from MC10, Designing Voice Interfaces for Wearables and Other Form Factors with Tanya Kraljic from Nuance Communications, and Wireless Connectivity and Wearables: The What, How, and Why with Cary Bran from Plantronics.
Visit the session scheduler on the Designers of Things Conference website for the full session listing or download the Official DoT 2014 app.

DoT 2014 will take place September 23-24, 2014 at the Mission Bay Conference Center at UCSF in San Francisco, California.

Last Week to Register for DoT 2014 with Special Pricing

Advance rates for Designers of Things expire Friday, September 12. Register this week to save up to $150 on your VIP, Tech or Demo Pass.

All pass holders will gain access to the Demo Hall, featuring cutting-edge technologies from innovative companies, including Autodesk, Freescale and Grid Connect. Join them and other participating companies to learn about new products, interact with designers and developers, and establish relationships with the brightest minds in wearable tech, 3D printing and IoT. Additionally, pass holders are invited to attend on-site parties hosted by Shapeways and Proto Labs after the Demo Hall closes on Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively.

Read More

Opening Up IP to Make Really Cool Things: Featured Speaker Duann Scott
Back in July, Hasbro and Shapeways embarked on a completely new venture never before attempted by a major brand. The global toy maker opened up its IP for its uber popular “My Little Pony” franchise to enable fans to 3D print and sell their own creations on leading 3D printing platform Shapeways. We caught up with Shapeway’s Designer Evangelist, Duann Scott, to chat about this partnership and talk about how cool things can happen when brands open up their products to the 3D printing community.
[[MORE]]SuperFanArt launched at Comic-Con 2014 and saw five designers have license granted to them to create new art and product offerings under the My Little Pony Hasbro brand. All of the designs, including some pretty wicked “Bronies” are all for sale on the Shapeways site. 
Scott told us that this is just the start of the partnership with Hasbro and that we should see the SuperFanArt program expand to offer license to a wider audience and start to include other Hasbro brands such as Dungeons and Dragons and Transformers.
As exciting as seeing branded art being created by fans that love it, for Scott the fact that a large brand like Hasbro has opened its IP to allow for the design community to collaborate is “groundbreaking”. He hopes that the success of this program will serve as a case study for those brands who may be afraid that they will lose control if they do the same. And he is hopeful that more brands and companies move in this direction.
The benefit for brands to partner with a platforms like Shapeways in creating 3D printed user generated content is the manufacturing, distribution and customer service. As Shapeways handles the printing and selling of the branded art, the print quality and customer experience associated with its brand is kept at a high level of standard. The benefit for the designers is the license to create under an existing brand and have the ability to profit from it. 
Scott sees more and more software being developed for designers to be able to customize without the need to know conventional 3D modelling techniques removing one of the major barriers of 3D printing today. With tools making the process easier to create and the license from brands to give designers the freedom to do so, 3D printing is well positioned to develop a new type of market where brands co-create with the community to develop new interpretations and products they may not have had the ability to realize otherwise.
Duann Scott will be speaking about the Hasbro-Shapeways partnership at the Designers of Things conference later this month in a session called “Fans + Open IP = Internet of Really Cool Things”. 
- - - - - - - -
This article is part of our featured speaker series for Designers of Things Conference which takes place September 23-24, 2014 at the Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco, California. Get your VIP and Tech passes by clicking here. 

Opening Up IP to Make Really Cool Things: Featured Speaker Duann Scott

Back in July, Hasbro and Shapeways embarked on a completely new venture never before attempted by a major brand. The global toy maker opened up its IP for its uber popular “My Little Pony” franchise to enable fans to 3D print and sell their own creations on leading 3D printing platform Shapeways. We caught up with Shapeway’s Designer Evangelist, Duann Scott, to chat about this partnership and talk about how cool things can happen when brands open up their products to the 3D printing community.

Read More

Stratasys and Jenny Wu Pair Up To Create 3D Printed Jewelry Collection
Leading 3D printing company, Stratasys, has partnered with designer and architect, Jenny Wu, on her first 3D printed jewelry collection called LACE. The collection includes necklaces and rings which are inspired by geometric patterns and organic movement which are motifs found in the art and design installations she is most known for.
[[MORE]]
Wu is an American architect and partner at the award-winning firm Oyler Wu Collaborative which specializes in experimental and progressive projects. Its most recent installation, The Cube, was a sixteen meter tall painted steel and rope installation created for the Beijing Biennale.
The LACE collection comprises of a line of 3D printed wearable jewelry including the graphic Tangens necklace which will be made available in black, white or translucent and a sterling silver polished Papilio ring inspired by the fluttering of a butterfly wing. The Papilio ring was recently sold via Paddle8, the International fine art and collectibles auction site.

"I wanted to design a range of jewelry that could be avant-garde yet wearable, and approached it from my architectural heritage of spatial and line-based geometries to form a bold but soft spectacle for the body," Jenny Wu explains. "From my 15 years’ experience with 3D printing for architectural projects, I knew it would deliver the capabilities to realize my creative vision for jewelry. 3D printing offers an elegant aesthetic and enables different layers and densities of fine and detailed pieces to be intertwined and produced within hours instead of months."
The LACE collection is in the final production stage and will be available Autumn 2014 from: http://www.jennywulace.com/

Stratasys and Jenny Wu Pair Up To Create 3D Printed Jewelry Collection

Leading 3D printing company, Stratasys, has partnered with designer and architect, Jenny Wu, on her first 3D printed jewelry collection called LACE. The collection includes necklaces and rings which are inspired by geometric patterns and organic movement which are motifs found in the art and design installations she is most known for.

Read More

Linkin Park Gets 3D Printed For Fans 
Linkin Park is the latest music group to leverage the power of 3D printing to market its music. The band has teamed up with German 3D scanning and printing shop, Stramba, to offer realistic figurines of each band member to mark “The Carnivores World Tour 2014”.
[[MORE]]
Based in Berlin, Stramba offers 3D printed photo-realistic figures and call themselves “pioneers” in this field. They offer their services to print and handcraft celebrities as well as ordinary people. 
Back in June of 2014 they scanned the entire band of Linkin Park and are now offering fans the chance to buy band members individually or as a group. Limited edition 1:5 scaled versions of Rob Borudon, Mike Shinoda, Chester Bennington and others in the band retail for $499 with only 99 available in the run. While a regular run of figurines scaled 1:10 of the each band member is available for $149. The entire band can be bought as one figure for $295.
All 3d figures are made of polymer clay and are printed and handcrafted in Berlin by Stramba. They take up to two weeks to create on demand and then another 3-4 days to ship. Right now Stramba has “exclusively opened [its] doors for Linkin Park” but its website states that they “will add more celebrities from Music, Sports, Movies and more all the time”.
Linkin Park joins Cut Copy and Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke and W.ill.i.am in using 3D printing to market music either by showcasing this new technology in a music video, like Cut Copy and W.ill.i.am have done in the past, or in the case of Kele Okereke actually use a 3D printer to print LPs of a new track.

Linkin Park Gets 3D Printed For Fans 

Linkin Park is the latest music group to leverage the power of 3D printing to market its music. The band has teamed up with German 3D scanning and printing shop, Stramba, to offer realistic figurines of each band member to mark “The Carnivores World Tour 2014”.

Read More

Protecting 3D Printing Designs: Featured Speaker Patience Jones
As the consumer 3D printer space grows, so too are concerns about pirating of digital files which allow people to 3D print designs without the designers permission or any direct compensation for its use. In a way, the physical world is about to embark on a similar journey the media industry continues to struggle with in managing and monetizing products that have now gone digital. We sat down with Designers of Things speaker, Patience Jones, who graduated from the University of Michigan Law school to get glimpse into this topic which she will be also speaking about at the conference in September.  
[[MORE]]
Jones has extensive experience working in the legal field on cases involving Intellectual Property. When it comes to protecting of 3D designs, Jones told us that in theory the same protections of written work apply, namely copyright, trademark and patents. But at this time it remains to be seen how the courts will apply the current structure to this new technology. And it may not be for a couple of years until we see some answers come to light. Jones told us that a critical 3D IT patent case was filed in Minnesota in 2013 and is currently scheduled to be handled by the courts in 2015.  
In the meantime, she did suggest that we could look to what happened in the music space, especially around the time of Napster, where a lot of fines were being thrown around before the fusion in the market took place and new monetization models appeared, including streaming music companies.
Jones did give some advice for those designing in 3D. The first is to understand who their client is and what the client expects. If you are a designer who has been commissioned to design a vase for someone, you need to know who owns the right to that vase. Will you own the rights or is the expectation that those rights will be transferred to the client you are working for. The second is that you have to register the right with the patent office and the bigger and more complex the project is, the more you will want to get an attorney involved. 
Ultimately though, when it comes to designs, there is a lot of room for interpretation, Jones told us. The closest thing she can relate to 3D printable designs are cases where large retailers get sued by designers for supposedly stealing their patterns and making them for cheaper. Despite years of litigation, many of these cases have not ended up very successful for the designers who take action.
Patience Jones will be talking about “3D IP: Intellectual Property Issues for Innovators” at our upcoming conference in San Francisco this September. 
- - - - - - - -
This article is part of our featured speaker series for Designers of Things Conference which takes place September 23-24, 2014 at the Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco, California. Get your VIP and Tech passes by clicking here.
 
 

Protecting 3D Printing Designs: Featured Speaker Patience Jones

As the consumer 3D printer space grows, so too are concerns about pirating of digital files which allow people to 3D print designs without the designers permission or any direct compensation for its use. In a way, the physical world is about to embark on a similar journey the media industry continues to struggle with in managing and monetizing products that have now gone digital. We sat down with Designers of Things speaker, Patience Jones, who graduated from the University of Michigan Law school to get glimpse into this topic which she will be also speaking about at the conference in September.  

Read More

Gartner Hype Cycle Pegs Wearables, Connected Homes & Consumer 3D Printing as 5 to10 Years Out
The Gartner Hype cycle is a fantastic tool for businesses to plan their attack in using emerging tech in their portfolios. This year’s report shows the long road wearables, consumer 3D printing and even the connected home have before they reach success with the mass market. 
[[MORE]]
Gartner positions consumer 3D printing and Wearables in the “Peak of Inflated Expectations” phase which represents a time when a hype cycle encounters a lot of publicity with some successes and scores of failures. Both are pegged to reach mainstream adoption (or the “Plateau of Productivity”) in 5 to 10 years.
Enterprise 3D printing on the other hand has been identified as being in the “Slope of Enlightenment” phase, a time when benefits are clear and enterprises start to get behind a hype cycle. Gartner predicts that enterprise 3D printing will reach mainstream adoption in 2 to 5 years.
When it comes to the Connected Home, Gartner sees this hype cycle as having the longest road of those that we have discussed. Connected home is defined here as a potential technology, living in the first phase as a Technology Trigger. 
One interesting hype cycle to note is Gesture Control which has graduated to the Slope of Enlightenment when comparing this year’s report to the 2013 version. Gartner gives Gesture Tech a 2 to 5 year estimate on mainstream adoption.
The Hype Cycle diagram is just one part of a full report by Gartner who is celebrating its 20th year of publishing this type of insight.

Gartner Hype Cycle Pegs Wearables, Connected Homes & Consumer 3D Printing as 5 to10 Years Out

The Gartner Hype cycle is a fantastic tool for businesses to plan their attack in using emerging tech in their portfolios. This year’s report shows the long road wearables, consumer 3D printing and even the connected home have before they reach success with the mass market. 

Read More

Bringing On The Industrial Renaissance: Featured Speaker - Samir Shah

4 AXYZ is in the additive manufacturing business. But instead of printing with plastic, the company has developed technology which would allow them to create the first 3D printing machine to manufacture solid wood products. The company believes that a machine with this potential could radically shift the way we create and buy items crafted out of wood.  

Read More

US Army Looking Into 3D Printed Food for Soldiers
Soldiers of the US army may soon be eating 3D printed food tailored to fit their nutritional needs. According to Army Magazine, the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (or NSRDEC) is currently evaluating new methods of 3D printing which would allow soldiers to print pizzas to sandwiches with 3D printers equipped with ingredients they are either provided or, possibly in the future, items they have foraged in the field.
[[MORE]]One of the methods the Research Centre is assessing is the use of ultrasonic agglomeration, a process which shoots ultrasonic waves at particles to bind them together. Using this method, 3D printers would be able to create solid food in shapes you would expect, like a pizza looking like a pizza for example. This would drastically increase items on the military menu and could even reduce food costs because food could be printed on demand.
But the real benefit for NSRDEC is the ability to print food that is enhanced with nutrients which would be tailored to the particular dietary needs of the solider depending on their situation. “If you are lacking in a nutrient, you could add that nutrient. If you were lacking protein, you could add meat to a pizza,” Lauren Oleksyk, an NSRDEC researcher, told Army Magazine.
Food printing is already something that is being achieved in the 3D printing space but it is still very much in its infancy with most of the methods layering paste to create candy and edibles that need to be baked. Advancements in food printing spearheaded by the military could have far-reaching impacts on not just how we feed our soldiers but possibly how we feed our communities. We may all one day be heading to our 3D printers to cook up a family dinner.  
Source: Army Magazine via Motherboard/VICE

US Army Looking Into 3D Printed Food for Soldiers

Soldiers of the US army may soon be eating 3D printed food tailored to fit their nutritional needs. According to Army Magazine, the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (or NSRDEC) is currently evaluating new methods of 3D printing which would allow soldiers to print pizzas to sandwiches with 3D printers equipped with ingredients they are either provided or, possibly in the future, items they have foraged in the field.

Read More

Report Finds Businesses Evaluating 3D Printers, Few Using Them
3D printers have definitely gained a lot of attention this past year. These powerful maker machines have the potential to disrupt many industries but how many businesses are actively using them and for what? These are some of the questions Tech Pro Research asked to over 600 businesses in a study they did on “3D Printing: Benefits, Trends, Enterprise Applications”. 
[[MORE]]
The report found that many businesses are evaluating the use of 3D printers but few are actively using them. In fact only 12% of the respondents indicated that they were using 3D printers at work. But despite the small number of organizations who are using them, most surveyed (48%) are evaluating them with 19% planning to implement 3D printers within the next 12 month. 40% of those surveyed said that they had no plans to implement or evaluate 3D printers for their business.  
Of those that are using 3D printers, most are using these machines for testing of ideas or concepts (73%) while prototyping (67%) and manufacturing of parts (40%) were also ways 3D printers were adding value to organizations.
For the 40% of businesses who are currently not considering 3D printing, Tech Pro Research found a lack of business need (66%) and lack of value proposition (27%) to be the reasons. They also identified that companies who do not perform engineering or manufacturing work do not see the benefit of these devices.

Report Finds Businesses Evaluating 3D Printers, Few Using Them

3D printers have definitely gained a lot of attention this past year. These powerful maker machines have the potential to disrupt many industries but how many businesses are actively using them and for what? These are some of the questions Tech Pro Research asked to over 600 businesses in a study they did on “3D Printing: Benefits, Trends, Enterprise Applications”. 

Read More

Amazon Launches 3D Printing Services To Offer Customizable Accessories, Toys and More
Back in June, Amazon opened up a 3D printing store as a centralized place to sell 3D printers, filament and other tools needed to start 3D printing at home. Today, Amazon has taken its 3D printing services one step further with the launch of a 3D printed product marketplace which allows users to customize over 200 print-on-demand items. 
[[MORE]]The marketplace features search tools, 3D previews and a personalization widget which lets users make modifications to select items by changing things like material, size, style and color. It also showcases 3D printed products which are for sale as is.
“The introduction of our 3D Printed Products store suggests the beginnings of a shift in online retail - that manufacturing can be more nimble to provide an immersive customer experience. Sellers, in alignment with designers and manufacturers, can offer more dynamic inventory for customers to personalize and truly make their own,” said Petra Schindler-Carter, Director for Amazon Marketplace Sales. “The 3D Printed Products store allows us to help sellers, designers and manufacturers reach millions of customers while providing a fun and creative customer experience to personalize a potentially infinite number of products at great prices across many product categories.”
Amazon’s 3D printed marketplace is currently selling customizable jewellery like cufflinks and earrings, toys like Mixee’s bobble heads and home decor items like vases. We gave the personalization a widget a spin this morning and it was extremely straightforward and is very much geared towards users who are not familiar with 3D design. We personalized our own pair of cufflinks in just three clicks. 

Although 3D printing marketplaces are not new, a store of this magnitude behind the Amazon brand will go a long way to bringing 3D printing options to the main stream. This benefits both users who are looking for more personalized options and designers who are in need of a place to sell their 3D printed wares.

Amazon Launches 3D Printing Services To Offer Customizable Accessories, Toys and More

Back in June, Amazon opened up a 3D printing store as a centralized place to sell 3D printers, filament and other tools needed to start 3D printing at home. Today, Amazon has taken its 3D printing services one step further with the launch of a 3D printed product marketplace which allows users to customize over 200 print-on-demand items. 

Read More

Michigan Hosts World’s First 3D Printed Tee-Ball Game 
Two Western Michigan Little League teams made history last week as the first to play tee-ball with equipment made entirely from a 3D Printer. All elements of the game were made on a 3D printer including the helmets, bats, bases, tees and even the balls.
[[MORE]]
The event was hosted by 3D printing company Burton Precisions Co Inc. and Universe 3D who were also responsible for printing all the materials. The one-hour game saw twenty-six little league players using the 3D printed equipment to hit homeruns and steal bases on the same field as Minor League Michigan team the Whitecaps.
A game facilitated entirely out of 3D printed materials showcases the opportunities 3D printers offer in bringing manufacturing to the masses to allow them to print the tools they need for any situation. 
Image Source: 3DPrint.com

Michigan Hosts World’s First 3D Printed Tee-Ball Game 

Two Western Michigan Little League teams made history last week as the first to play tee-ball with equipment made entirely from a 3D Printer. All elements of the game were made on a 3D printer including the helmets, bats, bases, tees and even the balls.

Read More

Your Next Ice Cream Sundae Could Be 3D Printed
We’ve seen candies, cake toppers and even pizza get the 3D printer treatment. So it was just a matter of time that Summer’s favorite treat, ice cream, joined the party. MIT students have hacked a 3D printer to produce soft serve ice cream in any shape. 
[[MORE]]
The 3D ice cream printer was part of a graduate project for the students as part of the additive manufacturing program at MIT. The students built a cooling system using liquid nitrogen to ensure that the ice cream kept its shape.  The coolant allowed the ice cream to be built up in layers just like a traditional 3D printer would when using plastic.
The team told 3Ders.org that they were inspired to build a 3D printer that use ice cream as they thought it would be fun for children. Although the machine needs a lot of refinement, they believe that in the near future ice cream parlors like Dairy Queen will adopt the use of this technology to take ice cream treats the next level.

Your Next Ice Cream Sundae Could Be 3D Printed

We’ve seen candies, cake toppers and even pizza get the 3D printer treatment. So it was just a matter of time that Summer’s favorite treat, ice cream, joined the party. MIT students have hacked a 3D printer to produce soft serve ice cream in any shape. 

Read More

Celebrate the First Moonwalk with 25% Off DoT 2014
The 2014 Designers of Things conference – taking place September 23 & 24 in San Francisco – is celebrating the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing! Register here before July 26, 2014 and save 25% on VIP and Tech passes.
[[MORE]]The conference schedule continues to grow. Check out a few recently added sessions:
Designing for Quantified OtherSteven Eidelman | Co-founder, Whistle
Challenges of a 3D Printing StartupMarcus Foley, Aaron Rowley, Joseph White | Co-founders, Electroloom
Identification, Authentication and Customization with BiometricsKarl Martin | CO-founder & CEO, Bionym
View the latest conference agenda.

Celebrate the First Moonwalk with 25% Off DoT 2014

The 2014 Designers of Things conference – taking place September 23 & 24 in San Francisco – is celebrating the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing! Register here before July 26, 2014 and save 25% on VIP and Tech passes.

Read More