Turning Trash Into Treasure with 3D Printing
A Seattle entrepreneur wants to take recycling to a whole new level. Working together with a local inventor, she has developed a machine that turns plastic bottles into 3D printing filament allowing makers to literally turn their trash into newly created treasures. 
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Founder Liz Havlin is currently preparing a Kickstarter campaign to create an open sourced desktop recycling machine called the Legacy Filament Extruder. The machine turns recycled plastic pellets into 3D printer ink. Havlin hopes to raise $30,000 to make this concept a reality.
The machine is just one part of the equation. Havlin has partnered with a company who will take collected recycled plastic and make the necessary pellets needed to create the filament using the Legacy. This partnership removes the need for additional machinery to be created or bought to processes the plastics itself.  
Once things are up and running, Havlin aims to be able to collect recycling at a location in Seattle, exchange it for pellets and then sell 3D printer filaments created by the extruder.
The Legacy could be the start of a new way to tackle a huge environmental problem which continues to plague our oceans and our wildlife. In addition, as Havlin points out on her draft Kickstarter page, the collection of plastics and other recycling is already a means for people to earn money to help them lift themselves out of poverty. The use of these materials for a growing demand of makers could help further this social cause as well. 
via VentureBeat

Turning Trash Into Treasure with 3D Printing

A Seattle entrepreneur wants to take recycling to a whole new level. Working together with a local inventor, she has developed a machine that turns plastic bottles into 3D printing filament allowing makers to literally turn their trash into newly created treasures. 

Founder Liz Havlin is currently preparing a Kickstarter campaign to create an open sourced desktop recycling machine called the Legacy Filament Extruder. The machine turns recycled plastic pellets into 3D printer ink. Havlin hopes to raise $30,000 to make this concept a reality.

The machine is just one part of the equation. Havlin has partnered with a company who will take collected recycled plastic and make the necessary pellets needed to create the filament using the Legacy. This partnership removes the need for additional machinery to be created or bought to processes the plastics itself.  

Once things are up and running, Havlin aims to be able to collect recycling at a location in Seattle, exchange it for pellets and then sell 3D printer filaments created by the extruder.

The Legacy could be the start of a new way to tackle a huge environmental problem which continues to plague our oceans and our wildlife. In addition, as Havlin points out on her draft Kickstarter page, the collection of plastics and other recycling is already a means for people to earn money to help them lift themselves out of poverty. The use of these materials for a growing demand of makers could help further this social cause as well. 

via VentureBeat

Notes

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  9. nefelibata-xx reblogged this from designersofthings and added:
    I love science!!!
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  15. sophiaxing reblogged this from designersofthings and added:
    #gra612resources
  16. acrashingtrainofthought reblogged this from laurathexplora8
  17. laurathexplora8 reblogged this from designersofthings and added:
    This is a really great concept. However, I wonder how harmful the chemicals in plastic would be in this process.
  18. warcats-cat reblogged this from designersofthings
  19. piecesoflogic reblogged this from chaosnewsinc
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  21. ocrian reblogged this from designersofthings and added:
    Yes. Please. We need to get on this.

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